Tag Archives: SBS

Chris Carillo To Oversee SBS/L.A. As Radlovic Exits Again

Chris Carrillo, a veteran of SBS’s Los Angeles operations who has served as GSM, LSM and as a Sr. AE for the company’s regional Mexican KLAX-FM 97.9 “La Raza” and Latin Rhythmic KXOL-FM “L.A. 96.3,” has been named VP/GM for the Spanish-language duo.

“Chris’s radio experience and acumen are a matter of indisputable record and we’re confident of his leadership abilities in taking our stations to the highest level of operational excellence in the Los Angeles market,” Rodriguez said. “He knows radio, he knows the advertisers, he knows the Company and its people and he’s intimately familiar with our West Coast stations. No one is more qualified to take over the reins of SBS Los Angeles.”

Carillo has also been a Sr. AE for Clear Channel’s radio stations in Los Angeles.

Carillo assumes duties held since mid-July by SBS COO Albert Rodiguez and, prior to that, by Marko Radlovic.

Radlovic exited on July 15 after rejoining SBS/Los Angeles as SVP/West Coast Regional Manager in June 2015.

In that role, he also had oversight of regional Mexican KRZZ-FM 93.3 in San Francisco.

Radlovic had previously held various managerial positions at SBS from 2001 through 2011, including roles as Chief Revenue Officer and COO. From 2011-2005, he served as President/Market Manager for Cumulus Media in Los Angeles.

 

 

 

Vinyl & Copy: Why Multicultural Agencies And Records Are So Alike

Several years ago, perhaps at a Speed Dating event or a networking Happy Hour somewhere in Los Angeles, guests were presented with a series of ice-breaker questions to help start the conversation. The question posed to me was, “What’s the one thing you own that you’ll never, ever get rid of?”

Without hesitation, I responded, “My record collection.”

My LPs and 45 RPM singles are some of my cherished possessions. For years, friends and colleagues couldn’t understand why I had transported—at significant cost—my collection across the country each of the three times I’ve relocated in the last 25 years. Furthermore, how could I possibly be investing in additions to a collection that was perhaps outmoded and arcane, given the rise of the compact disc and, following that, digital downloads and streaming services?

My answer is simple: The iPod and my iPhone are great for hearing music, but the record player is the best device for listening to music.

There’s a difference between hearing and listening. It’s time to demonstrate that difference to marketers, brand managers and C-suite executives. Much has been said and shared about the rapidly evolving Hispanic market. But, have the decision-makers been listening to what has been said, and are they making choices based on efficiencies, rather than conclusions derived from the largest amount of data ever made available to marketers about today’s U.S. Hispanic consumer?

In September 2015, a Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data showed the immigrant share among each of the U.S.’s Hispanic origin groups in decline, affirming reports that immigration from Latin America—in particular, Mexico—is slowing.

The Hispanic Market Overview annual report has stated for the last several years that the U.S. Hispanic population is now being driven by births, rather than those who are foreign-born. Additionally, it should be emphasized that immigration is slowing but has not stopped. Far from it: the U.S. Hispanic population in 2000 was comprised of 14.1 million immigrants. By 2013, that number grew to 19 million.

A market of 19 million consumers should be an opportunity for brands who wish to establish themselves as a top choice when it comes time to make purchasing decisions. Remember, everyone shops. The recent Latino immigrant needs food, packaged goods, clothing, transportation, and health care information regardless of their financial status. The upscale Latino and Latino Baby Boomer are equally important.

Yet, marketers seem fixated on a Hispanic plan of action focused squarely on bilingual Latino millennials who can be targeted through the English-language media they consume.

Why? They’ve been spending too much time hearing how to do more through “total market” capabilities instead of listening to the experts and veterans who have modernized their agencies but have remained true to what works for today’s Latino consumer.

The aural quality of a record is richer, and deeper. One simply hears more. It’s imperfect, with the pops and hisses and skips on well-worn favorites. The U.S. Hispanic advertising agency of today is no different than a record. The people inside these businesses have the deepest and richest insight on Latino consumers, and are the perfect partners to work alongside a general-market agency.

According to Nielsen, sales of vinyl records grew by 30% in 2015, to 11.9 million, from 9.2 million in 2014. Music fans are rediscovering records.

It’s now time for marketers who have turned to the dreaded adaptation and translation approach to rediscover the value of Hispanic advertising agencies.

With an uncertain economy once again rearing its ugly head, and a presidential election that has put Hispanics in an understated role as ultimate decision maker, we’ve put on our thinking cap and our reading glasses to provide a Total Focus to Hispanic marketers and advertising agency executives on everything keeping you up at night—and everything keeping the lights on and the paychecks from bouncing.

Hispanic Market Overview 2016, presented by Lopez Negrete Communications, is now available for complimentary download at http://reports.hispanicad.com/reports/HMO2016/

As the industry’s key executives gather in Miami Beach for the 20th annual ahaa conference, this year bearing the name “The Future in Focus,” we hope this report generates conversation, thought and perhaps a little controversy. Congratulations to Leif Roll, VP of Marketing at State Farm, on being named Marketer of the Year. We’ve seen a lot from State Farm in the U.S. Hispanic market. But where is GEICO? Who is Progressive’s Latina counterpart to Flo?

We also single out Eric Reynolds, CMO of The Clorox Company, as Clorox has demonstrated an exceptional understanding of the Latino consumer through product development and subsequent marketing efforts that make the company a standout. Your lavender-scented products can be found throughout the Hispanic Market Overview ohana.

Please enjoy this seventh annual Hispanic Market Overview, presented by López Negrete Communications. As you are reading this, please listen to what is being said. Otherwise, they’re just words that you may be hearing, but not digesting.

Reading, while listening to your favorite record album, is highly recommended.

 

Adam R Jacobson

Mixed Results For Hispanic Radio As Overall Dollars Tumble In Chicago

CHICAGO — January 23, 2015 — According to the annual Miller Kaplan revenue report for the nation’s third largest market, total radio income for the market’s stations dipped from $419,715,000 in 2013 to $376,231,000 in 2014. For Hispanic radio, the growth seen in recent years has perhaps ebbed — substantially.

Univision’s regional Mexican WOJO-FM remains the billing leader for Spanish-language stations in Chicago. However, total station revenue (which includes NTR and digital) is off 12.8% year over year, to $18.5 million. That puts it ninth overall.SBS-owned regional Mexican WLEY-FM enjoyed a 3.4% jump in revenue in 2014. However, it’s total revenue of $8,592,000 — while No. 2 among Spanish-language stations in the Windy City — remains nearly $10 million behind WOJO in the battle for dollars.

Meanwhile, iHeart’s WNUA-FM 95.5, the one-time Spanish Hot AC “Mega” which in its final Hispanic incarnation competed against WOJO and WLEY as regional Mexican “Patron,” saw revenue slide nearly 18% from 2013 to 2014, to $7.5 million. WNUA earlier this month changed its programming to English-language country music, as WEBG.

There was a huge gain in total revenue for Univision’s Spanish contemporary “Latino Mix” WVIV-FM 93.5/WVIX-FM 103.1 (the simulcast partners saw total revenue increase 60.9% year-over-year), to $5.1 million. Still, the overall numbers pale in comparison to general-market radio stations, increasing the call among Hispanic marketers and media sales executives to do more to build their “total market” stories.

— Adam R Jacobson

‘Piolin’ Flies Back To Terrestrial Radio With AGM Deal

By Adam R Jacobson

LOS ANGELES — December 4, 2014 — Three months after disappearing from satellite radio broadcaster SiriusXM, the former king of Spanish-language AM and FM radio is heading back to terrestrial radio.

However, it’s not known if he’ll be heard in L.A. or in any major market soon.

 

Eddie ‘Piolin’ Sotelo, who shot to fame at Univision Radio’s KSCA-FM 101.9 in Los Angeles before abruptly exiting the top-rated regional Mexican station amid sexual harassment allegations in July 2013, will now have his El Show de Piolin heard on two American General Media (AGM) stations: “Radio Lobo” KLVO-FM 97.7/KKIM-FM 94.7, serving the Albuquerque-Santa Fe DMA; and KEBT-FM “96.9 La Caliente” in Bakersfield, Calif. The new incarnation of El Show de Piolin will be heard on the stations in January.

It’s the start of a climb back to the top for Piolin, who joined SiriusXM in October 2013 as part of a major initiative to lure Hispanic subscribers. The addition of the one-time Arbitron ratings champ proved less than successful for SiriusXM, and the satcaster canceled El Show de Piolin just after Labor Day 2014.

Piolin’s much-heralded arrival at SiriusXM came amid claims he had sexually harrassed a male producer. At the same time, Piolin was forced to pay $100,000 in legal fees for former co-workers who a judge ruled had not extorted the host.

Piolin’s new show will be syndicated to AGM’s two stations, and it is not yet publicly known where the show will be based or who will be distributing the program.

 

 

Hispanic Media Ad Expenditures Tumble For Radio, Rise For TV In Q1

According to Kantar Media, Spanish-language television continues to enjoy robust advertising growth.

However, what Kantar defines as “Hispanic Local Radio” experienced a significant year-over-year dip–a worrying sign in a volatile market for Spanish-language and Hispanic-targeted AM and FM broadcasters.

Spanish Language TV soared 18.0 percent in Q1 2014, compared to Q1 2013, primarily from gains at broadcast networks, Kantar reported today. The category includes four undisclosed Spanish-language broadcast networks, four Spanish-language cable networks, and 77 local broadcast channels targeting Spanish speakers.

At the same time, “Hispanic Local Radio” stations–reflecting Spanish-language stations in 24 markets–were down 10.8 percent. The decline is being blamed on lower spending from retailers, auto dealers and restaurant categories. It is the first time Kantar has provided a specific look at Hispanic radio in its quarterly ad expenditure reports.

Total advertising expenditures increased 5.7 percent in Q1 2014, to $34.9 billion, Kantar Media notes.

Every measured type of television had expenditure increases in Q1 2014, compared to Q1 2013. Call it the Olympics Effect.

“The Winter Olympics delivered its expected windfall in the first quarter, adding about $600 million of incremental ad spending to the marketplace. But the nature of the event is that this money is narrowly distributed and doesn’t benefit all sectors of the market,” said Jon Swallen, Chief Research Officer at Kantar Media North America. “Subtracting the Olympics’ contribution, the growth rate for remaining expenditures was just under four percent.”

Overall results for the radio industry were mixed: National Spot Radio was up 6.7 percent, driven by a larger number of brands using the medium. But local radio, reflected by Kantar as only English-language stations, suffered an ad expenditure decline of 4.7 percent. 

HISPANIC PRINT STAYS HEALTHY

As noted in the EPMG-distributed Hispanic Print Overview 2014, produced by The Adam R Jacobson Editorial Services & Research Consultancy, Hispanic print media has fared strongly compared to English-language print media–notably newspapers–with respect to ad growth.

This is reflected in Kantar’s latest data, which show year-over-year ad expenditures for Spanish-language newspapers statistically flat (+0.2) in Q1. By comparison, all print newspaper media experienced a 5% year-over-year ad expenditure drop in the quarter.

Similarly, Hispanic magazines–led by People en Español and Vandidades–experienced a strong 15.8 percent ad expenditures gain in Q1 ’14, compared to the same period a year ago. Overall, magazines saw a 1.6 percent decline in ad revenue during the period. The bottom line totals were skewed by severe reductions from the two largest magazine advertisers (Procter & Gamble and L’Oreal), who account for more than ten percent of total spending for all magazines, regardless of language.

UNIVISION RADIO DRAWS THE RADIO DOLLARS

According to local advertising research firm BIA/Kelsey, the No. 1 Hispanic radio station by estimated revenue in FY 2013 is Univision Radio’s gold-based Spanish Adult Contemporary KLVE-FM “Radio Amor” in Los Angeles. The station accounted for $31.2 million in estimated revenue during the year.

Close behind at No. 2 is another L.A. radio station—Liberman’s regional Mexican KBUE-FM “Qué Buena,” with estimated billing of $27.3 million. Three L.A.-based radio stations can be found in the top five, with SBS’s KLAX-FM “La Raza” ranked seventh nationally with an estimated $20.3 million in revenue.

Univision stations dominate the top 10, while SBS takes three of the spots. But SBS dominates in New York, as Univision’s WXNY-FM and WADO-AM are not among the nation’s top 10 Hispanic stations by billing.

Top 10 radio stations by estimated annual billing estimates

 Call Letters Format Market

Market Rank

Owner Revenue (in 000s)
KLVE Spanish AC Los Angeles, CA

2

Univision

$31,200

KBUE Reg. Mexican Los Angeles, CA

2

Liberman

$27,300

WSKQ Tropical New York, NY

1

SBS

$25,000

KLTN Reg. Mexican Houston, TX

6

Univision

$24,200

KSCA Reg. Mexican AC Los Angeles, CA

2

Univision

$22,200

WOJO Reg. Mexican Chicago, IL

3

Univision

$21,200

KLAX Reg. Mexican Los Angeles, CA

2

SBS

$20,300

WAMR Spanish Cont. Miami, FL

11

Univision

$18,200

WPAT Spanish Cont. New York, NY

1

SBS

$17,200

WEPN Spanish Sports New York, NY

1

ESPN Deportes Radio

$16,500


Source: Media Access Pro™, BIA/Kelsey, 2013

 

THE HMO INTERVIEW: Stacie de Armas, Nielsen

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW 2014 – InFocus Excerpts

Hispanic Market Overview 2014, presented by Lopez Negrete Communications, is now available via download at no charge to all via HispanicAd.com. We thank the more than 3,000 industry professionals who downloaded this year’s report within the first 24 hours of its release.

Due to the size of the PDF file, iPad and iPhone users have been unable to view the document. Therefore, AdamRJacobson.com will be offering select excepts from this year’s report in the coming weeks as a benefit to industry professionals.

We begin our series of excepts with a Q&A session from Los Angeles featuring Nielsen’s Stacie de Armas.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________

HISPANIC MEDIA MEASUREMENT

It’s hard to believe that Arbitron doesn’t exist anymore.

The venerable radio industry ratings company in 2013 entered into a merger acquisition
agreement with Nielsen, and on September 20 the Federal Trade Commission
approved its $1.26 billion acquisition of the Columbia, MD-based operation.
For Hispanic radio executives, the end of Arbitron means an end to complaints about
sample size, language preference, country of origin requests, and ways to ensure that
the PPM accurately measures Latinos’ exposure to AM and FM radio stations and their
respective audio streams.

Or does it?

Stacie de Armas, an Arbitron veteran who now holds the title
of VP of community alliances, events and engagement, at
Nielsen, agreed to a Q&A session conducted from her Los
Angeles office.

Here are some of the highlights of our discussion:
HMO: What is the biggest concern among your clients with
respect to Hispanic media measurement? Are they vocal in
seeking a single metric for their media buying and planning?
Or, is it about radio ratings, TV ratings, digital impressions, etc.
independently and their ability to capture Hispanic
consumers?

STACIE: Our clients and the market are enthusiastic about the changes that have come
to Nielsen Audio recently and the changes that are forthcoming. For example, in the
second half of 2013, there were improvements to adults 25-34 representation from a
special action plan implemented in summer 2013, and we have seen an average
proportionality index increase.

Equally important, Nielsen in the process of implementing an overall boost in PPM
sample size of approximately 7%; better sample representation of Hispanics and
African-Americans; and improved in-station monitoring of the PPM encoding system.

These improvements were requests that came directly from our clients and we are
pleased to be rolling them out.

HMO: Language preference and weighting, as a result of population changes, sent
some radio operators into a tizzy in some markets because it seemed a particular metro overnight went from Spanish-dominant to English-dominant. What is Nielsen Audio doing to educate the market on these adjustments?

STACIE: Annually, there is an update to language usage estimates for English-dominant
and Spanish-dominant Hispanics. The most recent one was in January 2014. There was
some movement in the Spanish dominant figures over the continental U.S. in the past
year, based on the most recent population estimates. Nielsen’s Measurement Science
organization has a dedicated group for creating and analyzing universe estimates, and
they are continually reviewing these figures to ensure they are reflective of the
population. Nielsen makes this data available to our subscribing clients for review in
applicable markets.

HMO: Is Hispanic radio still, in the minds of advertisers and/or operators, “Spanish-language radio”? At a recent industry conference there seemed to be no delineation between the two, which I find worrisome.

STACIE: We can’t speak for advertisers or operators, but we can say that we have begun to hear discussions about advertisers wanting to touch Latinos with ‘cultural relevance’. That is to say, that advertising that appeals to Latinos comes in many forms, including Spanish, English, and in a bilingual fashion. But cultural relevance is playing an increasingly important role.

Advertisers say that one of the most important elements of great creative targeted toward Latinos is that it resonates, has significant cultural relevancy, and can be delivered in any language. Having said that, Hispanics still listen to more radio than any other demographic group.

Nationwide, more than 93% of all Hispanics age 12 or older (or 40 million listeners) use radio every week. Regional Mexican has the largest share of listening among Hispanics.

HMO: What can you say with respect to Hispanics tuning to radio, and Hispanics listening to AM and FM stations via a digital or online platform? What are the exciting things we are seeing with respect to trends and growth?

STACIE: There is no doubt that Hispanics consume audio through a variety of platforms both over-the-air, and online via smartphones, tablets, notebook/desktop computers and digital car dashboards. It should be noted that Hispanics are adopting smartphones at a higher rate than any other demographics group: Nearly 3 in 4 Latinos own a smart phone.

Mobile phones, among other options, are heavily used to stream audio and video content. We know that 37 percent of Latinas stream audio on their phones. This is an exciting time for radio as they fine tune their various platforms to resonate with this key group.

HMO:  With Arbitron’s absorption into Nielsen, the ability to look at Hispanic media consumption is stronger than ever. But have we reached a point where we must break out Hispanics who speak Spanish versus Hispanics who speak English on all reports?

STACIE: For many marketers, radio groups, television and cable networks and others, language usage and preference among Latinos is an important metric that we supply in most of our reports. Country of Origin information was added for Hispanic Radio markets in 2008 and can be found by subscribers in both the eBook and in software applications.


HMO


Top Hispanic Market Execs Talk ‘Total Market’ In HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW 2014

Is all of the endless chatter about “total market” total BS?

Is the advertising and marketing industry’s infatuation with millennials completely daft, since these consumers are more likely to have crappy jobs and far less money to spend on anything when compared to their parents and grandparents?

Is it time for the author of Hispanic Market Overview, presented by Lopez Negrete Communications, to say “So long and -30-” because Hispanic marketing and advertising has peaked and is starting its slow, painful slide downward?

“Um, I think not,” says Adam R Jacobson, a veteran Hispanic market media strategist who serves as the author and publisher of the renowned Hispanic Market Overview report. “Yet there’s an endless array of chatter about how marketers and advertisers need to fully understand “total market approaches” — whatever the heck they are.”

In the fifth edition of Hispanic Market Overview, the question of “what is ‘total market’  and how does the marketer best tackle this in their buying and planning and Hispanic executions?” is fully probed by some of the top executives in the Hispanic market today.

We also examine the coveted Latino millennial, and why they are important as influencers and are social media leaders.

At the same time, we look at how the Hispanic consumer  is at the forefront of swift changes in how we consume media, and why the debate of ‘Hispanic’ versus ‘Spanish-language’ needs to be put to rest once and for all.

Hispanic Market Overview, now available via PDF download exclusively from HispanicAd.com, features discussions with these top names:

Alex Lopez Negrete, President/CEO, Lopez Negrete Communications

Ingrid Otero-Smart, President/CEO, Casanova Pendrill

Daisy Exposito-Ulla, head of d exposito & Partners

Liz Castells-Heard, head of Castells & Asociados

Manuel Machado, CEO and co-chairman, MGSCOMM

Keith Turner, President of Ad Sales & Marketing, Univision

Tom Maney, EVP/Ad Sales, Fox Hispanic Media

Mike Rosen, EVP/Ad Sales, Telemundo Media

Lino Garcia, General Manager and John Fitzgerald, Vice President, Sales at ESPN Deportes

Carlos Martinez, president, Conill

Natalie Boden, President, Managing Director, BodenPR

Horacio Gavilan, Exec. Director, ahaa

Dr. Felipe Korzenny, Ph.D, Director, Center for Hispanic Marketing Communication, Florida State University

Vanessa Lizama, Client Development Director and Soizic Sacrez, Director of Marketing, Terra

Stacie de Armas, Nielsen Audio

Additionally, the fifth annual Hispanic Market Overview for the first time will feature Hispanic consumer data from Experian Marketing Services, further elevating the value of this annual white paper. Among the topics we examine: “Where should marketers invest, in terms of mobile dollars, to best reach Latino consumers?”

This year’s report will also offer readers the opportunity to download the recently released Hispanic Print Overview, prepared by Adam R Jacobson via exclusive arrangement with EPMG of San Diego, CA as the industry’s most in-depth newspaper and digital news media White Paper.

“The U.S. Hispanic market has evolved at lightning speed, and having the knowledge and insights about where the Hispanic market truly is today is imperative for any marketer that truly seeks to capitalize on the most influential consumer group in North America,” says Jacobson, who has served as a multicultural analyst at Mintel and as a senior editor at Hispanic Market Weekly. “This report is designed to provide a singular authoritative source for CMOs and C-level executives that are ever-scrutinizing their budgets while tackling how to best reach the Latino consumer through total market approaches that incorporate the Hispanic millennial. Yes, everyone is talking about the millennial and the ‘total market,’ but these are important subjects to discuss because that discussion is what needs to drive additional dollars to the U.S. Hispanic market.”

To download Hispanic Market Overview. please visit HispanicAd.com or click here: http://hispanicad.com/sites/default/files/hmo/HMO2014.pdf

Note: The PDF file is very big and does not open on iPad or iPhone devices, nor on select smartphones.

SBS/Miami Plots New Route For WXDJ As ‘Romanic Rhythmic’ I-95 Hits The Airwaves

BY ADAM R JACOBSON

MIAMI — In a widely rumored move, Miami-based Hispanic media company SBS on Monday completed its transition of WXDJ-FM’s “El Zol” Tropical format to 100,000-watt powerhouse WRMA-FM by debuting on WXDJ what may be best-described as a hybrid Tropical/Spanish Contemporary format under the moniker “I-95” – pronounced “Eee-Noventa-y-Cinco.”

With a slogan promoting itself as the home for “ritmo romántico de Miami,” I-95 features a wide mix of current and recent Tropical and Spanish Contemporary hits.  The 6pm hour included songs from Prince Royce, Alejandro Sanz, Aventura, Chino & Nacho, Fonseca, Chayanne and Ricardo Arjona, among other artists. Popular English-language ballads can also be found on I-95, including Miley Cyrus’ “Wrecking Ball,” Pink’s “Just Give Me a Reason” and Aerosmith’s “I Don’t Want to Miss a Thing.” Reflecting Miami’s penchant for dance music, the 7pm hour also featured the popular nightclub track “Levels,” by Avicii. Other artists heard on I-95 include Spanish pop superstars Juanes and Maná.

I-95 is presently absent of air personalities and is commercial-free, with the focus on the station’s new musical direction, which incorporates elements of WRMA’s long-time “Romance” Spanish Adult Contemporary format with some of the English-language Top 40 hits aired on its successor presentation, “DJ106.7.” I-95’s 40,000-watt signal is centered in Miami-Dade County and enjoys city-grade coverage over southern Broward County, which has gained a considerable number of Latino residents in recent years.

Interestingly, it’s not the first time that a radio station in Miami has paid homage to one of the region’s busiest highways by using the “I-95” name. In the early 1980s, WINZ-FM battled WHYI-FM “Y-100” as a high-energy Top 40 that served as South Florida’s first home for the burgeoning rap and freestyle dance product that would later define longtime player WPOW-FM “Power 96.” WINZ-FM is now Clear Channel’s Spanish Contemporary WMGE-FM “Mega 94.9.”

With the debut of I-95, WRMA is now the sole home for “El Zol,” which takes a greater focus on bachata, merengue and much of the reggaetón-infused Latin Pop found on Spanish Contemporary stations across the eastern U.S. and Puerto Rico. The shift of El Zol to the 106.7 FM frequency ended a roughly 16-month run for “DJ106.7,” which featured noted Miami-based talent DJ Laz in morning drive and English-language pop music with Spanish-language commercials. The DJ106.7 presentation replaced Romance in July 2012.

The move to the bigger 106.7 FM frequency for El Zol has already improved SBS’s fortunes in the Nielsen Audio ratings for Miami-Fort Lauderdale. In December 2013, WXDJ cracked the top 10 by capturing a 3.9 share of all radio listeners, regardless of language –placing it behind only Univision Radio’s Spanish Adult Contemporary WAMR “Amor 107.5” in the battle for supremacy among Miami’s Spanish-language stations. WXDJ had a 2.8 share in October 2013, jumping past Univision Radio’s Spanish Contemporary WRTO “Mix 98” in December.

Univision Radio Offers ‘Good, Bad & Ugly’ As Post-Piolin Solution

DECEMBER 2, 2013 – Los Angeles – More than four months after Univision Radio confirmed the surprisingly abrupt departure from Univision Radio of Eddie “Piolin” Sotelo, the company today unveiled the program that will replace Piolin at its regional Mexican flagship KSCA-FM “La 101.9” in Los Angeles–but not on Piolin’s former Texas affiliates.

Univision Radio has paired KLNO-FM “La Que Buena” on-air personality Raul Molinar (known on the station as “El Primo”) with La 101.9 afternoon host Andres Maldonado (known on-air as “El Feo”) and Silvia del Valle, who joins Univision after a year with Glendale, CA-based Media Latino Communications’ La Numero Uno Network.

However, del Valle is perhaps best-known for her stint in middays at SBS’s regional Mexican KLAX-FM “97.9 La Raza” in Los Angeles as “La Bronca.” In that role, her program was simulcast on KRZZ-FM “La Raza 93.3” in San Francisco and on now-defunct WRAZ-FM “La Raza” in the Miami suburb of Homestead, Fla. Del Valle also found a national television audience through her role as a judge on Azteca America’s Quiero Ser Grupero competition show.

In Los Angeles the trio hit the air this morning in the 6-10am slot as “El Bueno, La Mala, y El Feo.” It is believed that the hosts will not use their previous on-air nicknames.

But the show, which already has a Facebook and Twitter social media presence and is using the “BMF Show” name as its unofficial shorthand name, will not replace Piolin in Houston, San Antonio, El Paso and the Rio Grande Valley. Rather, the trio’s new program will air in the 11am-3pm slot on KLTN-FM 102.9, KROM-FM 92.9, KBNA-FM 97.5, and KGBT-FM 98.5, respectively.

Univision Radio regional Mexican stations in Chicago, Dallas, San Francisco, San Diego, Phoenix, Fresno, Las Vegas, Austin and Albuquerque will also add “El Bueno, La Mala, y El Feo.” But Univision was coy on when the program would debut and did not note what time slot it would take in these markets.

In prepared comments, Univision Radio EVP/Content & Entertainment Evan Harrison–a Clear Channel exec who exited in spring 2011 as Clear Channel Radio EVP and digital president for the Chief Creative Officer role at VanWagner– noted, “As our audiences’ preferences continue to evolve, we need to find new and creative ways to entertain and engage them. El Bueno, La Mala, y el Feo is the answer. This incredibly dynamic team will really resonate with regional Mexican music lovers who also enjoy real people they can relate to.”

While Harrison is upbeat about the new program, Univision Radio has a tremendous challenge ahead as it attempts to recoup from steep ratings declines at many of the stations that once aired Piolin. According to Inside Radio analysis of Nielsen Audio data from July to September, a morning drive decrease in 25-54 share of a stunning 58% was seen at Univision’s KHOT-FM “La Nueva 105.9” in Phoenix, which now ranks eight-tenths of a share behind Entravision’s KLNZ-FM “Tricolor 103.5” in the overall ratings.

Similarly, Univision Radio’s KLNV-FM 106.5 in San Diego experienced a morning drive drop in 25-54 share of 54% between July and September 2013, Inside Radio reports. In Dallas, where Molinar has been based, KLNO lost 43% of its 25-54 morning drive share and 37% in total week. However, KLNO received a new competitor four days after Piolin left in KMVK-FM, which CBS Radio flipped from Spanish CHR to regional Mexican as “La Grande 107.5.”

It is also unclear why del Valle will apparently not be taking to Univision Radio airwaves as “La Bronca,” as she is known to legions of regional Mexican radio listeners in the Golden State. While using the name at KLAX, del Valle was sandwiched between then-morning host Renan Almendarez Coello’s El Cucuy de la Manana and an afternoon program hosted by El Mandril.

Interestingly, El Mandril–like Piolin–is also off of L.A. airwaves. However, the reason for the disappearance of El Mandril is hazy amid allegations first reported by La Opinion newspaper of Los Angeles that he or one of his associates is tied to a ratings manipulation claim under investigation by Nielsen Audio with the cooperation of KLAX owner SBS.

In Los Angeles, El Bueno, La Mala, y El Feo will seek to attract regional Mexican radio listeners in a market where Liberman Broadcasting’s “Que Buena” has capitalized on the presence of Don Cheto in morning drive throughout the disruptions at KSCA and KLAX.

Adam R Jacobson, reporting from Miami

 

Radio Ink Hispanic Radio Conference: Full Coverage

ADAM R JACOBSON, reporting from San Diego 

DAY TWO HIGHLIGHTS

‘CULTURE IS WHAT LINKS US TOGETHER’

And, says SBS CFO Joe Garcia, culture is what will make Spanish-language radiocontinue to maintain a sizeable audience in the U.S. Hispanic market. Garcia was joined by other group heads at the Radio Ink Hispanic Radio Conference’s concluding “Super Session,” with Davidson Media Group chairman Sanjay Sanghoee noting that Spanish-language radio stations the company owns and/or operates are likely to stay Spanish for years to come. Adelante Media Group CEO Jay Meyers believes that it will be at least 20 years before Hispanics start to tune out of Spanish-language radio in great numbers. Today, use of Spanish, or English, or a mix of both languages is highly dependent on how a company should best serve its particular market, says Entravision Communications radio division president Jeff Liberman. And if it is German Polkas that the Hispanic 18-49-year adult wants, that’s what they’ll get, says Univision Radio president José Valle.

‘IT’S TOUGHER THAN IT WAS TWENTY YEARS AGO’

Entravision’s Jeff Liberman says Hispanic radio needs to step up in unison and start fighting for its rightful share of the ad dollars. “We have to do a better job in sales and provide our advertisers reasons to buy us. Today, we have a more competitive marketplace. Research has gotten better. We need to unite, as an industry, and go after Corporate America. We can worry about competition later, but we need to hit Corporate America over the head … I’m going to do it whether I am joined or not.” Taking a similar tone, Adelante head Jay Meyers said he’s not one to go into an agency to talk about getting Hispanic advertising dollars. “I’m here to talk about how 100 percent of the dollars are going to reach 87 percent of the market … and that’s stupid! If we got 33 cents on the dollar for the percentage of the audience that is Hispanic, we wouldn’t be here [in San Diego] today. We’d be in Maui, paying our own way.”

DIGITAL COMPREHENSION VITAL TO LONGTERM INDUSTRY GROWTH

In opening comments on the second day of the Radio Ink Hispanic confab,Radio Ink publisher Eric Rhoads implored broadcasters to understand the impact online radio presents to them. “If you cannot understand these devices, you cannot protect your brand. You need to understand because it is changing the way people listen to the radio.” He discussed Tunein Radio (see Andres Cantor interview, above, for more) as a one-stop platform for radio and how manufacturers of audio systems desire one central delivery platform. “Ultimately, you need to be where your listeners are.”

‘CONTENT FLUIDITY IS REALLY IMPORTANT’

Tapestry Media Director Victor Garcia believes developing content that the media buyer can take wherever they want, free from the restrictions presented by working with one broadcast company over another, will best monetize beyond the AM/FM band and bring greater ROI. “To depend on one specific vehicle will leave us all shut,” he said. Speaking on a panel devoted to finding new accounts and fostering advertiser growth, Garcia noted that Starcom Mediavest’s Tapestry unit “wants to hold our multicultural plans to the same rigor as the general market.” He’s seen many situations where an investment occurs, but without a goal. His job – to stop such scenarios.

SESSION SOUNDBYTES

“The recording industry through downloads and digital content have taken it on the chin and are now trying to recoup by putting it on the backs of radiobroadcasters.” – Francisco Montero, co-managing partner of Fletcher, Heald and Hildreth, discussing the Performance Rights Act.

“When you sit around and look at some of the regulations broadcasters are forced to deal with, it’s just stupid. Having a public file was great stuff in the sixties, and the fifties, and the fourties. In 1977 people actually came in and looked at our public file. But today?” – Adelante Media Group CEO Jay Meyers, on how Federal government regulations need to better reflect today’s consumer environment.

“We need to think about creating environments and programs that get people engaged and stop offering one-way messages and treat them as users – and not as consumers.” – Sensis Agency president José Villa.

 

DAY ONE HIGHLIGHTS

Action. Unity. Those were the two words Radio Ink publisher Eric Rhoads asked attendees of the Radio Ink Hispanic Radio Conference to write down and act upon. Kicking off the two-day confab yesterday, Rhoads advocated for industry unity. “This conference represents opportunity for the heart of the radio industry to make change.”

Still, the industry has come a long way since 1962, when honorary conference chair and industry icon Eduardo Caballero launched a Spanish-language radiostation in New York. Later, when he launched a national network advertising sales representation firm for Hispanic radio, there were still challenges – just 49 Spanish-language radio stations were on the air in the U.S., and agencies ignored him. This forced Caballero to go direct to the advertisers – something that gives Hispanic broadcasters an advantage today, capitalizing on the ability to sell to people without having a microfocus on CPM.

‘DON’T MISUNDERSTAND THE THREAT OF THE INTERNET’

In a moving acceptance speech of the 2012 Lifetime Achievement “Medallas de Cortez” award, Lotus Communications CEO Howard Kalmenson urged conference attendees to pay heed to the threat of in-vehicle internet access – something that will end radio‘s exclusivity while on the road. “Exclusivity in the car has been our life blood. Now, you’ve got competitors you’ve never dreamed of. They don’t need towers. They don’t need offices. Think over what’s really coming … and ask, ‘What do I do for the next 50 years?’” Going back to basics is one of Kalmenson’s suggestions; he refused to reveal the other ideas he has in mind. Receiving 2012 Medallas de Cortez as Station of the Year for Markets 1-25: Entravision’s Mexican Regional KDLD-FM 103.1 “El Gato” in Los Angeles. Taking the award for markets 25+ is Connoisseur Media’s KBBX-FM in Omaha. For a full list of award winners, visit http://www.radioink.com.

A POLITICAL STORY THAT MUST INCLUDE HISPANICS

Hispanic entrepreneur Charles Garcia, best-selling author of A Message from Garcia and Leadership Lessons of the White House Fellows, told conference attendees in a keynote address that radio‘s key business trait is its ability to touch people’s hearts. He devoted much of his conversation to the importance of Latinos in the 2012 Race to the White House: Of the 15 “swing states” Republicans must capture, the majority have significant numbers of registered Hispanic voters. Given the lack of support among Latinos of the two leading Republican presidential nominees, Garcia believes it is nearly impossible for President Obama to lose the November election. For radio, bringing the political message of both the Republican nominee and Obama’s reelection campaign to Latinos is essential – and the industry should do its part to foster political advertising at its stations.

In a prerecorded statement, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) noted that radio plays a critical role, not just in this year’s elections, but moving forward with respect to connecting to a large segment of voters. Politicians should rely on Spanish-language to get the message out, and to continuously inform the public on information pertinent to them.

SESSION SOUNDBYTES

“We have to keep a particular eye on what is going on in digital. It is growing and it is working and at the end of the day it is about the right ROI.” – MEC Managing Director Gonzalo Del Fa

“To win the game, you have to know what the rules are to win that game.” – Programming consultant Bob Perry, who says a station with both English-language and Spanish-language programming is dependent on the unique dynamics of each individual market.

“In the PPM world we’re programming on a minute-by-minute basis.” – Haz Montana, Operations Manager, Univision Radio/Los Angeles, who believes growing the “big tent” has led to the end of Spanish-language radio shows known for “shock moments” designed to aid recall when completing an Arbitron diary.

For complete conference coverage, please visit http://www.radioink.com