Tag Archives: Spanish-language advertising

Did Jose Villa Just Kill Your Business?

In a declaration distributed over the Thanksgiving holiday — appropriately, on Black Friday — José Villa, President of Los Angeles-based digital cross-cultural agency Sensis put another dagger into the fragile heart of U.S. Hispanic marketing.

Via the widely read MediaPost blog, Villa made the audacious proclamation that “Millennials and Gen Z are the Hispanic market.”

Using Geoscape data, a pie chart showed the following:

  •  Millennials now comprise 29% of the U.S. Hispanic population
  • Generation Z is now 36% of the U.S Hispanic population

That’s right. Some 65% of the Hispanic population falls into this group.

So, it’s natural for a digital guy who needs business to put marketer focus on this digitally savvy group, and hype up bilingual, bicultural blah-blah while ignoring some simple statistics that continue to get ignored by agenda-driven  business leaders.

  1. Who has the greatest amount of disposable income?
  2. Who depends more on Hispanic (i.e. Spanish-language media) than any other Latino group?

I challenge you to put “Gen Z” and “Millennials” as one of your top 3 answers.

Ladies and gentlemen, we are at a crossroads as an industry ready to tear itself apart over the digital revolution, increased use of English as a preferred language (but not an exclusive one), and advertisers who still only know what we as an industry tell them.

So let’s start telling them the truth and stop depending on agenda-driven save-my-business propaganda.

If not, the clients will be eating ostrich burgers with sofrito and adobo made from the contracts you lost.

Villa writes, “Most Hispanic marketing, however, is still focused on the 35% of older Hispanics and their Spanish-language media consumption.”

Well, did Villa ask perhaps why?

  1. The AARP Latino has far more disposable income. They are more likely to own or rent their own home. They likely spend more on travel, on health care, on clothing, on … well, just about anything.
  2. Older Hispanics are more dependent on Spanish-language media consumption. So, as a brand manager with a total marketing directive and limited budget, this would be more effective since younger Latinos can be reached on The CW and ABC, right?

Citing Nielsen and Kantar Media, Villa notes that 79% of major Hispanic media spend in 2015 went to TV (network + spot + cable) – “most of which went to Spanish-language broadcast and cable networks like Univision, Telemundo, ESPN Deportes and Discovery en Español.”

Here’s a serious question for you, José: Where else would be as wise as an investment in a total market world??

Villa continues about how the millennials aren’t getting their fair share of ad dollars, with regard to Hispanic efforts.

“While Millennials do watch Spanish TV, we know from our research that it is only a small part of their overall TV consumption – less than 1/3 of their average 15 hours of TV viewership per week. We also know that Hispanic Millennials and Gen Z spend most of their time consuming digital media. According to Simmons Connect (Spring 2016), digital makes up almost half – 47.3% – of Hispanic millennial media consumption on a weekly basis, or 45 hours per week! Yet almost 80% of Hispanic media spending goes to Spanish TV?”

As has been said many times in various ways, a Facebook “like” is not a sale.

We have put too much focus on millennials and Gen Z, a generation that has far less dollars than the Baby Boomers.

Yet we continue to be fixated on a Madison Avenue model that is stuck in the 1970s with respect to who the key target should be — first-time homebuyer, newlywed, baby on the way.

IN 1975 that could describe many a 27-year-old.

Today?

Give me a break.

“The reality is that the business of Hispanic marketing is still stuck in the past,” Villa writes.

That is incorrect. The entire U.S. marketing industry is stuck in the past by continuing to hyperfocus on a segment of consumers that may be trend-setting but aren’t the biggest spenders.

That must radically change if advertising agencies hope to stay relevant in the next five to 10 years. Otherwise, every major will have an in-house shop capable of doing the things you failed at in 2016.

Third Edition of ‘Hispanic CMO’ Report Set For October

Hispanic Media Sales, Inc., publishers of HispanicAd.com, will publish the third edition of the highly successful and sought after Hispanic CMO.

We will be adding more “Thought Leadership” once again to this year’s edition.  We will interview the Top Hispanic CMOs with dedicated budgets and resources targeting the US Hispanic Consumer.

Gilbert Davila, a recognized and admired Hispanic Market expert, will curate the supplement.  Adam R Jacobson,publisher of the annual Hispanic Market Overview since 2010 and a U.S. Hispanic media expert will conduct the interviews and write the supplement.

The 2016 Hispanic CMO will tackle the key issues of the year:

  • How to measure effective and efficient ROI in the US Hispanic Market
  • Total Market and it’s positive and negative potential
  • Organizational Structure, both on the client and ad agency side to handle Total Market

The 2016 Hispanic CMO will be published on October 10, 2016 during the ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Conference:

  • The supplement will be FREE to readers and is published digital to ensure additional pass along.
  • HispanicAd.com will promote heavily.
  • The 2015 Hispanic CMO published in November 2015 has delivered +7,000 download to date.
  • To read the 2015 edition CLICK HERE.

Sponsorship:

Participating Sponsor – 1 FP Hispanic CMO showcase section  – $3,500 net

For more information contact:

Gene Bryan at gbryan@hispanicad.com or 917-854-1706

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Can Multicultural Agencies Be The Best ‘Relationship Shops’?

 

HMO BACKtalk – The Chat Spot For Multicultural Marketers and Advertisers

On April 5, advertising industry executives received a jolting wake-up call that no matter how “solid” their relationship may be with a long-term client, a split could nevertheless happen.

After 46 years with Twin Cities-based shop Haworth Marketing & Media, Target Corp. confirmed that it was shifting its media and planning business—valued at $686.3 million—to WPP-owned GroupM.

The news resonated strongly with such key multicultural agency heads as Alex Lopez Negrete, of Lopez Negrete Communications.

But, journalists at Advertising Age covering the story neglected to rewind the clock to early 2011. That’s when Target Corp. sent a break-up notice to 50-person Minneapolis-based independent agency Peterson Milla Hooks (PMH). For Target, it was simply a consolidation move, with the work shifting to Wieden + Kennedy.

For PMH President Tom Nowack, it was a jarring jolt.

“We were fired,” Nowack told the Minneapolis Star-Tribune in an April 2013 interview. “We weren’t bitter, but it was difficult. It was a long relationship that we were really proud of and loved. Almost all of our [agency] income was from Target. It was a devastating blow.”

Recovery, or collapse, from the loss of a major client is a fact of life for advertising agency executives and their employees.

But, what if an agency were to take control of the relationship, steering a path with miles ahead while serving as the trusted, needed and necessary partner committed to brand growth and strong ROI?

That’s an opportunity multicultural shops should immediately capitalize on.

As a key “Relationship Shop,” the agency that can expertly guide a brand manager or CMO on a successful total market campaign wins. By taking the lead, and not direction, it also sends the message that the “multicultural marketer” is simply a segment marketer embedded in an American mainstream that will continue to evolve and embrace different heritages, races and cultural touchpoints.

Are any Hispanic advertising agencies already succeeding as a “Relationship Shop”?

Are any agencies losing the battle between client and agency, with the flow of directives coming in a one-way direction?

With fragile relationships in place and dollars the bottom line, perhaps a one-way flow of activity is better than none.

It’s not. It’s a dangerous route that puts talent in peril of job loss.

Take the lead. Make the suggestions. Offer ideas. Inspire your client.

Do this every day.

This could stop you from thinking about the horrors of losing your biggest client and start thinking about how important your team is to them, now and for always.

 

ARJ

 

Vinyl & Copy: Why Multicultural Agencies And Records Are So Alike

Several years ago, perhaps at a Speed Dating event or a networking Happy Hour somewhere in Los Angeles, guests were presented with a series of ice-breaker questions to help start the conversation. The question posed to me was, “What’s the one thing you own that you’ll never, ever get rid of?”

Without hesitation, I responded, “My record collection.”

My LPs and 45 RPM singles are some of my cherished possessions. For years, friends and colleagues couldn’t understand why I had transported—at significant cost—my collection across the country each of the three times I’ve relocated in the last 25 years. Furthermore, how could I possibly be investing in additions to a collection that was perhaps outmoded and arcane, given the rise of the compact disc and, following that, digital downloads and streaming services?

My answer is simple: The iPod and my iPhone are great for hearing music, but the record player is the best device for listening to music.

There’s a difference between hearing and listening. It’s time to demonstrate that difference to marketers, brand managers and C-suite executives. Much has been said and shared about the rapidly evolving Hispanic market. But, have the decision-makers been listening to what has been said, and are they making choices based on efficiencies, rather than conclusions derived from the largest amount of data ever made available to marketers about today’s U.S. Hispanic consumer?

In September 2015, a Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data showed the immigrant share among each of the U.S.’s Hispanic origin groups in decline, affirming reports that immigration from Latin America—in particular, Mexico—is slowing.

The Hispanic Market Overview annual report has stated for the last several years that the U.S. Hispanic population is now being driven by births, rather than those who are foreign-born. Additionally, it should be emphasized that immigration is slowing but has not stopped. Far from it: the U.S. Hispanic population in 2000 was comprised of 14.1 million immigrants. By 2013, that number grew to 19 million.

A market of 19 million consumers should be an opportunity for brands who wish to establish themselves as a top choice when it comes time to make purchasing decisions. Remember, everyone shops. The recent Latino immigrant needs food, packaged goods, clothing, transportation, and health care information regardless of their financial status. The upscale Latino and Latino Baby Boomer are equally important.

Yet, marketers seem fixated on a Hispanic plan of action focused squarely on bilingual Latino millennials who can be targeted through the English-language media they consume.

Why? They’ve been spending too much time hearing how to do more through “total market” capabilities instead of listening to the experts and veterans who have modernized their agencies but have remained true to what works for today’s Latino consumer.

The aural quality of a record is richer, and deeper. One simply hears more. It’s imperfect, with the pops and hisses and skips on well-worn favorites. The U.S. Hispanic advertising agency of today is no different than a record. The people inside these businesses have the deepest and richest insight on Latino consumers, and are the perfect partners to work alongside a general-market agency.

According to Nielsen, sales of vinyl records grew by 30% in 2015, to 11.9 million, from 9.2 million in 2014. Music fans are rediscovering records.

It’s now time for marketers who have turned to the dreaded adaptation and translation approach to rediscover the value of Hispanic advertising agencies.

With an uncertain economy once again rearing its ugly head, and a presidential election that has put Hispanics in an understated role as ultimate decision maker, we’ve put on our thinking cap and our reading glasses to provide a Total Focus to Hispanic marketers and advertising agency executives on everything keeping you up at night—and everything keeping the lights on and the paychecks from bouncing.

Hispanic Market Overview 2016, presented by Lopez Negrete Communications, is now available for complimentary download at http://reports.hispanicad.com/reports/HMO2016/

As the industry’s key executives gather in Miami Beach for the 20th annual ahaa conference, this year bearing the name “The Future in Focus,” we hope this report generates conversation, thought and perhaps a little controversy. Congratulations to Leif Roll, VP of Marketing at State Farm, on being named Marketer of the Year. We’ve seen a lot from State Farm in the U.S. Hispanic market. But where is GEICO? Who is Progressive’s Latina counterpart to Flo?

We also single out Eric Reynolds, CMO of The Clorox Company, as Clorox has demonstrated an exceptional understanding of the Latino consumer through product development and subsequent marketing efforts that make the company a standout. Your lavender-scented products can be found throughout the Hispanic Market Overview ohana.

Please enjoy this seventh annual Hispanic Market Overview, presented by López Negrete Communications. As you are reading this, please listen to what is being said. Otherwise, they’re just words that you may be hearing, but not digesting.

Reading, while listening to your favorite record album, is highly recommended.

 

Adam R Jacobson

Coming Monday: Hispanic Market Overview 2016

hmo2013  “Hello, it’s me. I was wondering if after all these years you’d like to meet.”

 

Those are the opening lyrics to Adele’s multiplatform smash hit “Hello.”

Advertising executives active in the U.S. Hispanic market who seek growth in 2016 and 2017 may be leaving that very voicemail and sending that very line via e-mail to potential clients that have had potential since Friends left the airwaves—and have yet to engage Latinos in Spanish-language media.

Then there are the regular players: the media, the agencies and the clients we always talk about.

But there’s so much more to be said. Only, who’s talking? If they are talking, what are they saying?

“It’s soft.”

That’s great if I’m buying a pillow. But, we’re talking about the fragile U.S. Hispanic market—one that has seen agencies shutter, and scant new major brands who’ve opted to speak to an important consumer group in Spanish.

These are concerning times, and the 2016 Hispanic Market Overview, presented by Lopez Negrete Communications, promises to provide readers with information, insight, statistics, commentary, and real-world remarks on how things really are.

With an uncertain economy—again—and the upcoming presidential election, we promise to put on our reading glasses and put Total Focus’ on everything keeping you up and night, and everything keeping the lights on and the paychecks from bouncing.

Gain ‘Total Focus’ by downloading the seventh annual Hispanic Market Overview state-of-the-industry report, produced by veteran Hispanic market analyst and journalist Adam R Jacobson, from Monday at Noon CET/6am ET/3am ET and Midnight, Hawaiian Time. This report is distributed exclusively by HispanicAd.com and presented by Lopez Negrete Communications.

ADVERTISING SPONSORS:

ALMA
Azteca América
d’expósito & Partners
ESPN Deportes
Eventus
Fox Deportes
La Agencia de Orcí
Pandora
Telemundo (NBCUniversal Hispanic Enterprises)
Anita Grace

For more information on sales opportunities for the 2016 Upfront Guide and 2016 Hispanic CMO report, contact Gene Bryan at 917-854-1706 or via e-mail at gbryan@hispanicad.com

For editorial opportunities, contact Adam Jacobson at 954-417-5146 or at adam@adamrjacobson.com

Hispanic Market Overview 2016, presented by Lopez Negrete Communications
builds on the insights and observations provided each business day in HispanicAd.com and in the October 2015 Hispanic CMO Thought Leadership report.

AHAA: Financial Services, Insurance Companies See Revenue Boost From Hispanic Ad Spend Bump

AHAA: The Voice of Hispanic Marketing released a new comprehensive study at the ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Conference which reveals a positive connection between corporate ad allocation targeting the Hispanic market and overall revenue growth for the Financial Services and Insurance sectors. According to the new study, a 5 point shift in advertising allocation from English to Hispanic media results in a Total Market revenue boost of 6.4 points in Revenue CAGR for the Financial and Insurance sectors.ahaa13

 

“This new information is compelling because the data indicates that the Hispanic market can be a big determinant in corporate success,” said Carlos Santiago, chair of AHAA Research Committee and CEO of Santiago Solutions Group.  “Financial Services and Insurance companies not only want to gain market share among their competitors but they also want to provide growth and stability for their investors – investing in Hispanic marketing is a clear strategy in achieving both these objectives.”

Financial/Insurance companies shifted almost $100 million in four years to Hispanic Media, at twice the rate of English media increases. Shifts in Hispanic Dedicated Allocation alone explain about 22 percent of the category’s change in topline revenue growth. The Financial/Insurance category spends a total of $352 million against Hispanic media. On average, it allocates 5.5 percent, or $10.1 million, of its advertising budget to Hispanic – this is a 35 percent increase since 2010. State Farm leads the charge in both investment percentage against Hispanic dedicated efforts at 22 percent and total Hispanic ad spending at $109 million. Wells Fargo, Nationwide, Allstate, JPMorgan Chase, American Family, AFLAC and MasterCard are close behind, setting the pace of the sector.

“AHAA’s research proves that companies applying a Total Market approach with well-funded in-culture Hispanic efforts are more likely to achieve greater overall growth than those marketers integrating Hispanics into their current English efforts,” said AHAA Chair Linda Lane Gonzalez, president of viva partnership. “The most successful campaigns lead with consumer insights that are then integrated, segmented and aligned – that is the winning combination driving superior growth performance.”

Methodology
Data was collected from Nielsen Monitor Plus which tracked over 340,000 companies’ advertising expenditures in English and Spanish.  This data was analyzed by Santiago Solutions Group for AHAA.  SSG divided companies into 5 Tiers according to the percent allocation to Spanish/Bilingual media: Best-in-Class (more than 14.2%), Leaders (6.4%-14.2%), Followers (3.6%-6.3%), Laggards (1.0%-3.5%), and On the Sidelines (Less than 1%). SSG also segmented the Top 500 Overall Spending (English + Spanish) Companies for years 2010-2014, thus permitting the analysis of trends in the marketplace. Ad Spend Includes spending in Network TV, Spot TV, Cable TV, Radio, Magazines, Newspaper & FSI. It excludes B2B, Display, Outdoor and Cinema.

Now Available For Download: 2015 Hispanic CMO Thought Leaders Report

The Adam R Jacobson Consultancy, publisher of HispanicMarketOverview.com, in partnership with Dávila Multicultural Insights of Encino, Calif. and HispanicAd.com, the U.S. Hispanic advertising and marketing industry’s most widely read and trusted media and information source, is pleased to announce the release of its second annual Hispanic CMO Thought Leadership Report.

The report, distributed exclusively by HispanicAd, honors the top Hispanic market “thought leaders”–marketing professionals who have been singled out as widely respected leaders who oversee a recognized multicultural or U.S. Hispanic program for a leading corporation with demonstrated subject matter expertise, out of the box thinking and strong leadership skills reflected both internally and across the entire U.S. Hispanic market landscape.

“Last year’s report was a resounding success,” says Gilbert Dávila, president and CEO of Dávila Multicultural Insights. “With the competition for the selection so tight, we decided to once again conduct a search and highlight the impressive contributions to the Hispanic market by corporate executives throughout the nation.”

This year’s Top Hispanic Market Thought Leaders were curated a team of U.S. Hispanic market professionals which curated the list for Dávila.

The report’s release is concurrent to the 2015 ANA Multicultural Marketing and Diversity Conference at the Fontainebleau Resort in Miami Beach, Fla., which kicked off yesterday with a standing-room-capacity crowd hearing key insights on how to develop total market strategies from Mariela Ure, Senior Vice President of Consumer Segments Strategy at Wells Fargo.

Editorial content for the report is being managed by Adam R Jacobson, publisher of the annual Hispanic Market Overview reports and editor of Multichannel News’ monthly “Hispanic Television Update” B2B newsletter.

In addition to profiles of this year’s top Thought Leaders, this special digitally distributed report will include a State of the Industry report on total market strategies and activities related to U.S. Hispanic advertising, digital vs. traditional ad spend in the U.S. Hispanic market, and the impact of millennials on U.S. Hispanic marketing and advertising.

The report also includes coverage of ahaa: The Voice of Hispanic Advertising’s 20th anniversary celebration, held concurrent to the inauguration of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History exhibit on the history of advertising in the U.S. The exhibit includes the history of U.S. Hispanic advertising thanks to the efforts of Ernest Bromley, Tony Dieste and industry advocacy organization ahaa, all of who have organized the donation of classic advertisements and other collateral for the permanent exhibit on the Mall in Washington, DC.

TO DOWNLOAD THE REPORT, CLICK HERE

 

For 2016 advertising solutions and partnership opportunities, please contact Gene Bryan at gbryan@hispanicad.com

 

 

THE HMO INTERVIEW: Alex Lopez Negrete

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW 2014 – InFocus Excerpts

Hispanic Market Overview 2014, presented by Lopez Negrete Communications, is now available via download at no charge to all via HispanicAd.com. We thank the more than 3,000 industry professionals who downloaded this year’s report within the first 24 hours of its release.

Due to the size of the PDF file, iPad and iPhone users have been unable to view the document. Therefore, AdamRJacobson.com will be offering select excepts from this year’s report in the coming weeks as a benefit to industry professionals.

We continue our series of excepts with a Q&A session from Houston featuring Alex Lopez Negrete.

 

THE HMO INTERVIEW: ALEX LOPEZ NEGRETE

In mid-March 2014, at a Miami event featuring one of the Latin world’s biggest recording artists, no one had many positive things to say about the U.S. Hispanic market. One familiar face shared the news that she had shifted agencies and had “happily” left the U.S. Hispanic market to focus on media buying and planning in Latin America. A longtime Hispanic market executive lamented that the market was still slow, and things were moving glacially. A third bemoaned layoffs at her company. A fourth person noted that he was actively looking for work in the “general market.”

Has the U.S. Hispanic market hit its peak? Are years of gloom and doom ready to set in?

If you’ve spoken with veteran Hispanic advertising industry executive Alex López Negrete lately, the answer is clearly, and emphatically, no.

“It’s been a crazy, wonderful year full of growth!” says Negrete, who oversees Houston-based Lopez Negrete Communications (LNC), a full-service Hispanic-focused multicultural agency that in 2015 will celebrate its 30th anniversary.

Among the highlights from the last 12 months: In June 2013, Verizon Communications announced that it had decided to consolidate its Hispanic market advertising efforts by awarding all strategic planning, creative, and digital responsibilities for Verizon Wireless from GlobalHue to LNC. Verizon’s relationship with LNC dates to October 2010, when it shifted its estimated $50 million U.S. Hispanic non-wireless business from GlobalHue.

In October 2013, LNC, which already has a Los Angeles outpost, opened the doors to its New York City office. Why? “I was drunk,” López Negrete says with a laugh.

“Connectedness to our clients and our community has always been the hallmark of our agency, but it is also a game of scale and access,” he says. “Having a New York presence was the next level of evolution for the agency, and having a large client in Verizon Wireless allowed us to achieve swift growth as a full-service agency. We’re very happy with how we are growing.”

With Bank of America a client now in its 21st year with LNC and Walmart set to celebrate 20 years with LNC next year, the agency has thrived with a diverse assortment of companies that have committed to reaching U.S. Hispanic consumers by directly communicating with them. Among LNC’s other clients are Shell, AARP, Pernod Ricard, Dr Pepper Snapple Group and hulu.

López Negrete is pleased that the CPG category remains strong, but hopes that pharmaceutical companies will “get serious about the Hispanic market” and increase their targeted marketing initiatives.

At the same time, López Negrete has worked hard across his agency’s departments to ensure that their client’s “total market” objectives are met. Asked how LNC ensures that their client has met its “total market” desires, López Negrete says, “It is the question we ask ourselves. “Everyone is confused about the ‘total market.’ Is it about the condition of the market? Is it about the approach to reaching the total market? Is it the ‘how’ to reach the total market, which is something like high school sex in that everyone talks about it but no one really does it?”

López Negrete begins to tackle the difficult question of how his agency defines what the “total market” is by first addressing the condition of the U.S. Hispanic market and the overall advertising landscape of today, compared to two decades ago.

“In 1995, we had the ‘general market’ and within that niche markets with some crossover messaging,” he says. “Today, these ‘little planets’ that represented the niche markets are now really big and has reshaped our reality of what the ‘general market’ is.”

Specifically, López Negrete sees several key things that brought today’s focus on “total market” strategies to what he believes are “hysterical levels.” First on his list is the redefinition of what is mainstream in the America of 2014.

He says, “The demographic reality of today’s ‘general market’ hit everyone square in the eyes. From a cultural, social, and economic perspective, these ethnic groups of 20 years ago now define what is now mainstream.” As a result, there has been a blurring of the lines in mainstream media, with growth in multicultural audiences and marketing efforts that target these consumers, López Negrete adds.

Second, he notes, “Corporate America has an insatiable thirst for growth, and the only growth area out there is the multicultural consumer—specifically Hispanic. But marketers are confused, because there are more options than ever before, and Corporate America has always wanted nice and easy solutions.”

That’s where the concept of “total market” initiatives get muddied. “We have the general-market agency out there exclaiming, ‘We can do it all!’, with one strategy, one overarching human truth, and a plan to solve the complex equation of how to best target the Hispanic consumer. It seems like part of the market is going to embrace adaptation and this ‘all for one’ approach, but to me it sounds like the 1980s and early 1990s all over again. Effectiveness and efficiency are not the same thing!”

López Negrete wants marketers to understand that today’s Latino consumer makes purchasing decisions based on their freedom of choice, and with more linguistic choices than ever they are continuously communicating in both Spanish and in English. Thus, he is confounded by the idea that “big blanket” broadcasting-focused initiatives can ultimately prove successful in a world where one-on-one marketing is bigger than ever.

That’s not to say using mainstream media to superserve a target audience while also appealing to all consumers can’t prove successful. López Negrete singles out Miami-based Alma, led by president and chief creative officer Luis Miguel Messianu, for its groundbreaking McDonald’s spot—Los Primeros Clientesthat aired on ABC during its March 4, 2014 telecast of The Oscars.

The 30-second commercial features a Hispanic teen who is shown on his first day at McDonald’s, working the drive-thru window and taking orders in English. His first customers? Mom and Dad, who are shown ordering in Spanish. Narration at the end of the commercial is done in Spanish.

“This succeeds because McDonald’s is being relevant to Hispanic audiences without alienating other audiences,” López Negrete says. “It’s a flat-out wave to Latino audiences on a night when Mexico got its first Best Director award [for Alfonso Cuarón].”

López Negrete laments that economic factors will lead to the continued use by some marketers of adaptations and translations of English-language creative designed for the general market. But, he’s certain more marketers will see big gains that figure out how to best carve out a “total market” strategy—or whatever the proper name may be.

“I don’t know if the term ‘total market’ is appropriate,” López Negrete says. “It’s more of an omnicultural market, where different cultures interact and absorb from one another without losing their identity. And, more and more, we’ll need to have the Hispanic agency as ‘the tour guide’ to the Hispanic market, being at the table from the very beginning. We are now in the decision-making process, and that’s what has changed from 20 years ago. Having influence, early in the process, has spread like never before.”

But, López Negrete warns, it takes clients that are truly committed to Hispanic marketing to not botch what transpires next.

“When the ‘sausage is made,’ the follow-through isn’t quite there despite the client’s good intentions,” he says. “For the agency, the task is to understand the brand essence, and show original work that does not betray that. You do not want to create brand chaos, yet the work has to unequivocally be Latino.”

While López Negrete is confident of the Hispanic market’s immediate future, he has no easy answers for where the market may be in 10 years, when the fuel behind the growth in the Hispanic population—U.S.-born Latino children—become consumers who may not need Spanish-language media.

“I’ve had some sleepless nights,” he admits. “We may not know where the market will eventually go, but we should help ourselves in getting to go where are consumers are going. The last thing we should do is help them go somewhere else.”

HMO 

Top Hispanic Market Execs Talk ‘Total Market’ In HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW 2014

Is all of the endless chatter about “total market” total BS?

Is the advertising and marketing industry’s infatuation with millennials completely daft, since these consumers are more likely to have crappy jobs and far less money to spend on anything when compared to their parents and grandparents?

Is it time for the author of Hispanic Market Overview, presented by Lopez Negrete Communications, to say “So long and -30-” because Hispanic marketing and advertising has peaked and is starting its slow, painful slide downward?

“Um, I think not,” says Adam R Jacobson, a veteran Hispanic market media strategist who serves as the author and publisher of the renowned Hispanic Market Overview report. “Yet there’s an endless array of chatter about how marketers and advertisers need to fully understand “total market approaches” — whatever the heck they are.”

In the fifth edition of Hispanic Market Overview, the question of “what is ‘total market’  and how does the marketer best tackle this in their buying and planning and Hispanic executions?” is fully probed by some of the top executives in the Hispanic market today.

We also examine the coveted Latino millennial, and why they are important as influencers and are social media leaders.

At the same time, we look at how the Hispanic consumer  is at the forefront of swift changes in how we consume media, and why the debate of ‘Hispanic’ versus ‘Spanish-language’ needs to be put to rest once and for all.

Hispanic Market Overview, now available via PDF download exclusively from HispanicAd.com, features discussions with these top names:

Alex Lopez Negrete, President/CEO, Lopez Negrete Communications

Ingrid Otero-Smart, President/CEO, Casanova Pendrill

Daisy Exposito-Ulla, head of d exposito & Partners

Liz Castells-Heard, head of Castells & Asociados

Manuel Machado, CEO and co-chairman, MGSCOMM

Keith Turner, President of Ad Sales & Marketing, Univision

Tom Maney, EVP/Ad Sales, Fox Hispanic Media

Mike Rosen, EVP/Ad Sales, Telemundo Media

Lino Garcia, General Manager and John Fitzgerald, Vice President, Sales at ESPN Deportes

Carlos Martinez, president, Conill

Natalie Boden, President, Managing Director, BodenPR

Horacio Gavilan, Exec. Director, ahaa

Dr. Felipe Korzenny, Ph.D, Director, Center for Hispanic Marketing Communication, Florida State University

Vanessa Lizama, Client Development Director and Soizic Sacrez, Director of Marketing, Terra

Stacie de Armas, Nielsen Audio

Additionally, the fifth annual Hispanic Market Overview for the first time will feature Hispanic consumer data from Experian Marketing Services, further elevating the value of this annual white paper. Among the topics we examine: “Where should marketers invest, in terms of mobile dollars, to best reach Latino consumers?”

This year’s report will also offer readers the opportunity to download the recently released Hispanic Print Overview, prepared by Adam R Jacobson via exclusive arrangement with EPMG of San Diego, CA as the industry’s most in-depth newspaper and digital news media White Paper.

“The U.S. Hispanic market has evolved at lightning speed, and having the knowledge and insights about where the Hispanic market truly is today is imperative for any marketer that truly seeks to capitalize on the most influential consumer group in North America,” says Jacobson, who has served as a multicultural analyst at Mintel and as a senior editor at Hispanic Market Weekly. “This report is designed to provide a singular authoritative source for CMOs and C-level executives that are ever-scrutinizing their budgets while tackling how to best reach the Latino consumer through total market approaches that incorporate the Hispanic millennial. Yes, everyone is talking about the millennial and the ‘total market,’ but these are important subjects to discuss because that discussion is what needs to drive additional dollars to the U.S. Hispanic market.”

To download Hispanic Market Overview. please visit HispanicAd.com or click here: http://hispanicad.com/sites/default/files/hmo/HMO2014.pdf

Note: The PDF file is very big and does not open on iPad or iPhone devices, nor on select smartphones.

Commentary: Hispanic Agencies, Media Hold The Cards (Or Domino Chips)

The following commentary appears in the July 23 news update of HispanicAd.com.

Over the weekend I had the pleasure of chatting with a 22-year-old Miami-born second-generation Cuban who is off to medical school in Pittsburgh next week.

We chatted about her desire to run a marathon, and about life in Miami.

She had on Variety 103.5, an English-language pop and classic hits station, but noted that her first choice when listening to the radio is Mega 94-9, “a Latin station.”

I suggested that before the big drive north that she pack supplies from Navarro Discount Pharmacy such as Café Bustelo, Maria cookies and other Cuban treats and products such as Adobo or Mojo Criollo that are difficult to find west of the Appalachians.

As we chatted it dawned on me that this young woman will soon represent one of the most desired consumers in the US – the young professional Hispanic millennial. We have seen study after study focus on this complicated group of Hispanics, who have embraced US and Latin culture and traditions in ways that are largely unique and incomparable between other groups of similar Hispanics by geographic area.

I am sure this young Cuban-American woman has little in common with a 22-year-old Latina who was born and raised in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles, or Dallas, or Chicago, or … well, just about everywhere else.

This got me thinking about Hispanic advertising, and why Hispanic advertising agencies and consultancies are more vital than ever when connecting marketers and brands to Latino consumers. We live the market. We understand the market. We experience the market.

A small boutique-like shop within a shop designed to allow general-market giants to capture Hispanic business may not have the individuals in-house that have the deep personal understanding of the Hispanic market as, well, the individuals at a Hispanic shop.

At the same time, Hispanic advertising agencies employ largely bilingual, bicultural individuals who are both US-born and first-generation immigrants from across Iberoamérica. Many are millennials. Many are the very target that so many marketers crave.

Hispanic agencies, thus, hold all the right cards. Or, in Miami, all the right domino chips. They have the insight to not only direct Hispanic marketing efforts but also hold the keys to the truck that’s driving all of a brand’s efforts moving forward, given the multicultural population surge that will one day soon make Whites a minority across the US, and not just in the top 15 DMAs.

My running buddy is one of thousands of unique Hispanic millennials. We as an industry focused on the Hispanic consumer have the best knowledge of how to connect to these consumers.

Marketers must understand this. If not, we all lose — even the brand and the total-market shop trying to accomplish something it may be ill-equipped to oversee.

 

ARJ