Tag Archives: HispanicAd

Now Available For Download: 2015 Hispanic CMO Thought Leaders Report

The Adam R Jacobson Consultancy, publisher of HispanicMarketOverview.com, in partnership with Dávila Multicultural Insights of Encino, Calif. and HispanicAd.com, the U.S. Hispanic advertising and marketing industry’s most widely read and trusted media and information source, is pleased to announce the release of its second annual Hispanic CMO Thought Leadership Report.

The report, distributed exclusively by HispanicAd, honors the top Hispanic market “thought leaders”–marketing professionals who have been singled out as widely respected leaders who oversee a recognized multicultural or U.S. Hispanic program for a leading corporation with demonstrated subject matter expertise, out of the box thinking and strong leadership skills reflected both internally and across the entire U.S. Hispanic market landscape.

“Last year’s report was a resounding success,” says Gilbert Dávila, president and CEO of Dávila Multicultural Insights. “With the competition for the selection so tight, we decided to once again conduct a search and highlight the impressive contributions to the Hispanic market by corporate executives throughout the nation.”

This year’s Top Hispanic Market Thought Leaders were curated a team of U.S. Hispanic market professionals which curated the list for Dávila.

The report’s release is concurrent to the 2015 ANA Multicultural Marketing and Diversity Conference at the Fontainebleau Resort in Miami Beach, Fla., which kicked off yesterday with a standing-room-capacity crowd hearing key insights on how to develop total market strategies from Mariela Ure, Senior Vice President of Consumer Segments Strategy at Wells Fargo.

Editorial content for the report is being managed by Adam R Jacobson, publisher of the annual Hispanic Market Overview reports and editor of Multichannel News’ monthly “Hispanic Television Update” B2B newsletter.

In addition to profiles of this year’s top Thought Leaders, this special digitally distributed report will include a State of the Industry report on total market strategies and activities related to U.S. Hispanic advertising, digital vs. traditional ad spend in the U.S. Hispanic market, and the impact of millennials on U.S. Hispanic marketing and advertising.

The report also includes coverage of ahaa: The Voice of Hispanic Advertising’s 20th anniversary celebration, held concurrent to the inauguration of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History exhibit on the history of advertising in the U.S. The exhibit includes the history of U.S. Hispanic advertising thanks to the efforts of Ernest Bromley, Tony Dieste and industry advocacy organization ahaa, all of who have organized the donation of classic advertisements and other collateral for the permanent exhibit on the Mall in Washington, DC.

TO DOWNLOAD THE REPORT, CLICK HERE

 

For 2016 advertising solutions and partnership opportunities, please contact Gene Bryan at gbryan@hispanicad.com

 

 

THE HMO INTERVIEW: Stacie de Armas, Nielsen

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW 2014 – InFocus Excerpts

Hispanic Market Overview 2014, presented by Lopez Negrete Communications, is now available via download at no charge to all via HispanicAd.com. We thank the more than 3,000 industry professionals who downloaded this year’s report within the first 24 hours of its release.

Due to the size of the PDF file, iPad and iPhone users have been unable to view the document. Therefore, AdamRJacobson.com will be offering select excepts from this year’s report in the coming weeks as a benefit to industry professionals.

We begin our series of excepts with a Q&A session from Los Angeles featuring Nielsen’s Stacie de Armas.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________

HISPANIC MEDIA MEASUREMENT

It’s hard to believe that Arbitron doesn’t exist anymore.

The venerable radio industry ratings company in 2013 entered into a merger acquisition
agreement with Nielsen, and on September 20 the Federal Trade Commission
approved its $1.26 billion acquisition of the Columbia, MD-based operation.
For Hispanic radio executives, the end of Arbitron means an end to complaints about
sample size, language preference, country of origin requests, and ways to ensure that
the PPM accurately measures Latinos’ exposure to AM and FM radio stations and their
respective audio streams.

Or does it?

Stacie de Armas, an Arbitron veteran who now holds the title
of VP of community alliances, events and engagement, at
Nielsen, agreed to a Q&A session conducted from her Los
Angeles office.

Here are some of the highlights of our discussion:
HMO: What is the biggest concern among your clients with
respect to Hispanic media measurement? Are they vocal in
seeking a single metric for their media buying and planning?
Or, is it about radio ratings, TV ratings, digital impressions, etc.
independently and their ability to capture Hispanic
consumers?

STACIE: Our clients and the market are enthusiastic about the changes that have come
to Nielsen Audio recently and the changes that are forthcoming. For example, in the
second half of 2013, there were improvements to adults 25-34 representation from a
special action plan implemented in summer 2013, and we have seen an average
proportionality index increase.

Equally important, Nielsen in the process of implementing an overall boost in PPM
sample size of approximately 7%; better sample representation of Hispanics and
African-Americans; and improved in-station monitoring of the PPM encoding system.

These improvements were requests that came directly from our clients and we are
pleased to be rolling them out.

HMO: Language preference and weighting, as a result of population changes, sent
some radio operators into a tizzy in some markets because it seemed a particular metro overnight went from Spanish-dominant to English-dominant. What is Nielsen Audio doing to educate the market on these adjustments?

STACIE: Annually, there is an update to language usage estimates for English-dominant
and Spanish-dominant Hispanics. The most recent one was in January 2014. There was
some movement in the Spanish dominant figures over the continental U.S. in the past
year, based on the most recent population estimates. Nielsen’s Measurement Science
organization has a dedicated group for creating and analyzing universe estimates, and
they are continually reviewing these figures to ensure they are reflective of the
population. Nielsen makes this data available to our subscribing clients for review in
applicable markets.

HMO: Is Hispanic radio still, in the minds of advertisers and/or operators, “Spanish-language radio”? At a recent industry conference there seemed to be no delineation between the two, which I find worrisome.

STACIE: We can’t speak for advertisers or operators, but we can say that we have begun to hear discussions about advertisers wanting to touch Latinos with ‘cultural relevance’. That is to say, that advertising that appeals to Latinos comes in many forms, including Spanish, English, and in a bilingual fashion. But cultural relevance is playing an increasingly important role.

Advertisers say that one of the most important elements of great creative targeted toward Latinos is that it resonates, has significant cultural relevancy, and can be delivered in any language. Having said that, Hispanics still listen to more radio than any other demographic group.

Nationwide, more than 93% of all Hispanics age 12 or older (or 40 million listeners) use radio every week. Regional Mexican has the largest share of listening among Hispanics.

HMO: What can you say with respect to Hispanics tuning to radio, and Hispanics listening to AM and FM stations via a digital or online platform? What are the exciting things we are seeing with respect to trends and growth?

STACIE: There is no doubt that Hispanics consume audio through a variety of platforms both over-the-air, and online via smartphones, tablets, notebook/desktop computers and digital car dashboards. It should be noted that Hispanics are adopting smartphones at a higher rate than any other demographics group: Nearly 3 in 4 Latinos own a smart phone.

Mobile phones, among other options, are heavily used to stream audio and video content. We know that 37 percent of Latinas stream audio on their phones. This is an exciting time for radio as they fine tune their various platforms to resonate with this key group.

HMO:  With Arbitron’s absorption into Nielsen, the ability to look at Hispanic media consumption is stronger than ever. But have we reached a point where we must break out Hispanics who speak Spanish versus Hispanics who speak English on all reports?

STACIE: For many marketers, radio groups, television and cable networks and others, language usage and preference among Latinos is an important metric that we supply in most of our reports. Country of Origin information was added for Hispanic Radio markets in 2008 and can be found by subscribers in both the eBook and in software applications.


HMO


Top Hispanic Market Execs Talk ‘Total Market’ In HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW 2014

Is all of the endless chatter about “total market” total BS?

Is the advertising and marketing industry’s infatuation with millennials completely daft, since these consumers are more likely to have crappy jobs and far less money to spend on anything when compared to their parents and grandparents?

Is it time for the author of Hispanic Market Overview, presented by Lopez Negrete Communications, to say “So long and -30-” because Hispanic marketing and advertising has peaked and is starting its slow, painful slide downward?

“Um, I think not,” says Adam R Jacobson, a veteran Hispanic market media strategist who serves as the author and publisher of the renowned Hispanic Market Overview report. “Yet there’s an endless array of chatter about how marketers and advertisers need to fully understand “total market approaches” — whatever the heck they are.”

In the fifth edition of Hispanic Market Overview, the question of “what is ‘total market’  and how does the marketer best tackle this in their buying and planning and Hispanic executions?” is fully probed by some of the top executives in the Hispanic market today.

We also examine the coveted Latino millennial, and why they are important as influencers and are social media leaders.

At the same time, we look at how the Hispanic consumer  is at the forefront of swift changes in how we consume media, and why the debate of ‘Hispanic’ versus ‘Spanish-language’ needs to be put to rest once and for all.

Hispanic Market Overview, now available via PDF download exclusively from HispanicAd.com, features discussions with these top names:

Alex Lopez Negrete, President/CEO, Lopez Negrete Communications

Ingrid Otero-Smart, President/CEO, Casanova Pendrill

Daisy Exposito-Ulla, head of d exposito & Partners

Liz Castells-Heard, head of Castells & Asociados

Manuel Machado, CEO and co-chairman, MGSCOMM

Keith Turner, President of Ad Sales & Marketing, Univision

Tom Maney, EVP/Ad Sales, Fox Hispanic Media

Mike Rosen, EVP/Ad Sales, Telemundo Media

Lino Garcia, General Manager and John Fitzgerald, Vice President, Sales at ESPN Deportes

Carlos Martinez, president, Conill

Natalie Boden, President, Managing Director, BodenPR

Horacio Gavilan, Exec. Director, ahaa

Dr. Felipe Korzenny, Ph.D, Director, Center for Hispanic Marketing Communication, Florida State University

Vanessa Lizama, Client Development Director and Soizic Sacrez, Director of Marketing, Terra

Stacie de Armas, Nielsen Audio

Additionally, the fifth annual Hispanic Market Overview for the first time will feature Hispanic consumer data from Experian Marketing Services, further elevating the value of this annual white paper. Among the topics we examine: “Where should marketers invest, in terms of mobile dollars, to best reach Latino consumers?”

This year’s report will also offer readers the opportunity to download the recently released Hispanic Print Overview, prepared by Adam R Jacobson via exclusive arrangement with EPMG of San Diego, CA as the industry’s most in-depth newspaper and digital news media White Paper.

“The U.S. Hispanic market has evolved at lightning speed, and having the knowledge and insights about where the Hispanic market truly is today is imperative for any marketer that truly seeks to capitalize on the most influential consumer group in North America,” says Jacobson, who has served as a multicultural analyst at Mintel and as a senior editor at Hispanic Market Weekly. “This report is designed to provide a singular authoritative source for CMOs and C-level executives that are ever-scrutinizing their budgets while tackling how to best reach the Latino consumer through total market approaches that incorporate the Hispanic millennial. Yes, everyone is talking about the millennial and the ‘total market,’ but these are important subjects to discuss because that discussion is what needs to drive additional dollars to the U.S. Hispanic market.”

To download Hispanic Market Overview. please visit HispanicAd.com or click here: http://hispanicad.com/sites/default/files/hmo/HMO2014.pdf

Note: The PDF file is very big and does not open on iPad or iPhone devices, nor on select smartphones.

Leo Burnett CCO: “We’re All ‘Under The Influence’ Of Creativity”

The 2013 ahaa annual conference concluded Wednesday afternoon in Miami Beach, Fla. with a resonating presentation from Leo Burnett Worldwide Chief Creative Officer Mark Tutssel, who singled out the Latin world for its “great love of creativity.” However, his presentation focused on the notion that the “tectonic plates of global marketing” are continually changing, thus putting marketers in a continuous battle to gain people’s attention.

 

Additionally, digital and social media has shattered the paradigm for traditional advertising campaigns. “Creativity without borders will set the benchmark for creative communications,” said Tutssel, who has four core roles that set the stage for borderless creativity.

 

The first rule, “Cultural Fluidity,” is based on his belief that advertisers and marketers are in constant competition for people’s attention. And with every single piece of work now shared around the world, the people are now empowered to influence and direct a brand’s message.

 

Tutssel’s second rule, “Democratization of Creativity,” revolves around his understanding that the production and distribution channels have been turned over to the masses. “What does that mean for us?” he asks, referring to the advertising agency. “It means we have competition not just from other advertising agencies—it is all of humanity.” Thus, Tutssel opines, creative needs to allow for participation from the consumer, allowing them to reimagine and repurpose traditional creative.

 

Being “Always On” is Tutssel’s third rule, remarkining that he couldn’t remember the last time he turned off his smartphone. Lastly, Tutssel said global collaboration—the industry’s “true north,” was essential for assuring that the brand’s creative speak exactly the same language, no matter its interpretation. “The industry’s future is discovery and curiosity,” Tutssel concluded. “Our world is a blank canvass.”

 

Tutssel’s concluding remarks followed a presentation featuring Walmart VP/Creative Marketing Greg Warren and SVP/Brand Marketing and Advertising that had the two executives present via video conference from an Admirals’ Club at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago, where the two were stuck due to cancelled flights and virtually accepted the honor of ahaa’s Marketer of the Year. Walmart’s extensive efforts to reach Hispanics were placed in the spotlight, including its “Operacion Parillada” television campaign designed to promote its steaks to Latino consumers.