Tag Archives: Hispanic advertising

Available Now: Your Complete Hispanic TV Upfront Outlook!

The Adam R Jacobson Consultancy, in partnership with HispanicAd.com, is pleased to announce the availability of the 2017 Hispanic TV Upfront Report.

french film festivalThis comprehensive guide, distributed exclusively by HispanicAd, offers readers a total look at the programs and trends shaping Hispanic-targeted broadcast and pay-TV networks serving Latino viewers across the U.S.

To view and download,  CLICK HERE.

Interviews with key executives from the leading networks will focus on what the big new shows are, how sports programming still draws huge audiences of both men and women, and why Spanish-language programming will continue to remain important for the next generation of Hispanic TV consumers.

The 2017 Hispanic TV Upfront Report is a specially produced electronically-delivered supplement to the regular HispanicAd.com weekly newsletter.


To read and download last year’s report CLICK HERE.

Did Jose Villa Just Kill Your Business?

In a declaration distributed over the Thanksgiving holiday — appropriately, on Black Friday — José Villa, President of Los Angeles-based digital cross-cultural agency Sensis put another dagger into the fragile heart of U.S. Hispanic marketing.

Via the widely read MediaPost blog, Villa made the audacious proclamation that “Millennials and Gen Z are the Hispanic market.”

Using Geoscape data, a pie chart showed the following:

  •  Millennials now comprise 29% of the U.S. Hispanic population
  • Generation Z is now 36% of the U.S Hispanic population

That’s right. Some 65% of the Hispanic population falls into this group.

So, it’s natural for a digital guy who needs business to put marketer focus on this digitally savvy group, and hype up bilingual, bicultural blah-blah while ignoring some simple statistics that continue to get ignored by agenda-driven  business leaders.

  1. Who has the greatest amount of disposable income?
  2. Who depends more on Hispanic (i.e. Spanish-language media) than any other Latino group?

I challenge you to put “Gen Z” and “Millennials” as one of your top 3 answers.

Ladies and gentlemen, we are at a crossroads as an industry ready to tear itself apart over the digital revolution, increased use of English as a preferred language (but not an exclusive one), and advertisers who still only know what we as an industry tell them.

So let’s start telling them the truth and stop depending on agenda-driven save-my-business propaganda.

If not, the clients will be eating ostrich burgers with sofrito and adobo made from the contracts you lost.

Villa writes, “Most Hispanic marketing, however, is still focused on the 35% of older Hispanics and their Spanish-language media consumption.”

Well, did Villa ask perhaps why?

  1. The AARP Latino has far more disposable income. They are more likely to own or rent their own home. They likely spend more on travel, on health care, on clothing, on … well, just about anything.
  2. Older Hispanics are more dependent on Spanish-language media consumption. So, as a brand manager with a total marketing directive and limited budget, this would be more effective since younger Latinos can be reached on The CW and ABC, right?

Citing Nielsen and Kantar Media, Villa notes that 79% of major Hispanic media spend in 2015 went to TV (network + spot + cable) – “most of which went to Spanish-language broadcast and cable networks like Univision, Telemundo, ESPN Deportes and Discovery en Español.”

Here’s a serious question for you, José: Where else would be as wise as an investment in a total market world??

Villa continues about how the millennials aren’t getting their fair share of ad dollars, with regard to Hispanic efforts.

“While Millennials do watch Spanish TV, we know from our research that it is only a small part of their overall TV consumption – less than 1/3 of their average 15 hours of TV viewership per week. We also know that Hispanic Millennials and Gen Z spend most of their time consuming digital media. According to Simmons Connect (Spring 2016), digital makes up almost half – 47.3% – of Hispanic millennial media consumption on a weekly basis, or 45 hours per week! Yet almost 80% of Hispanic media spending goes to Spanish TV?”

As has been said many times in various ways, a Facebook “like” is not a sale.

We have put too much focus on millennials and Gen Z, a generation that has far less dollars than the Baby Boomers.

Yet we continue to be fixated on a Madison Avenue model that is stuck in the 1970s with respect to who the key target should be — first-time homebuyer, newlywed, baby on the way.

IN 1975 that could describe many a 27-year-old.

Today?

Give me a break.

“The reality is that the business of Hispanic marketing is still stuck in the past,” Villa writes.

That is incorrect. The entire U.S. marketing industry is stuck in the past by continuing to hyperfocus on a segment of consumers that may be trend-setting but aren’t the biggest spenders.

That must radically change if advertising agencies hope to stay relevant in the next five to 10 years. Otherwise, every major will have an in-house shop capable of doing the things you failed at in 2016.

Hispanic Thought Leaders 2016 Report Released

The 2016 Hispanic CMO Hispanic Thought Leaders white paper,  produced by Adam R Jacobson exclusively from HispanicAd.com, is now available for free download at HispanicCMO.com.

This year’s report again tackles the topic of “total market” — and how our honored thought leaders have changed how they accomplish their goals both through internal restructurings of the marketing and brand management teams, and from a reimagining of how multicultural agencies influence and direct a brand’s overall message.

Our eight Thought Leaders are champions of Hispanic marketing, singled out by a team of professionals led by Gilbert Dávila, Chair of the ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Committee.

The report opens with a report on “total market” reaction, and action, on the agency level. We speak with Alma Co-President/COO Isaac Mizrahi and López Negrete Communications founder and President/CEO Alex López Negrete to get their unique views on how their respective shops have embraced — or rejected — “total market” approaches. López Negrete is especially vehement in his opposition to “total market” techniques seen in recent years.

The 2016 Hispanic CMO Thought Leaders Report is presented by López Negrete Communications.

The release of the 2016 Hispanic CMO Thought Leaders Report is tied to the ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Conference, 18th annual ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Conference, presented by Time Inc. The event is October 9-10, at the JW Marriott Los Angeles at L.A. Live.

Third Edition of ‘Hispanic CMO’ Report Set For October

Hispanic Media Sales, Inc., publishers of HispanicAd.com, will publish the third edition of the highly successful and sought after Hispanic CMO.

We will be adding more “Thought Leadership” once again to this year’s edition.  We will interview the Top Hispanic CMOs with dedicated budgets and resources targeting the US Hispanic Consumer.

Gilbert Davila, a recognized and admired Hispanic Market expert, will curate the supplement.  Adam R Jacobson,publisher of the annual Hispanic Market Overview since 2010 and a U.S. Hispanic media expert will conduct the interviews and write the supplement.

The 2016 Hispanic CMO will tackle the key issues of the year:

  • How to measure effective and efficient ROI in the US Hispanic Market
  • Total Market and it’s positive and negative potential
  • Organizational Structure, both on the client and ad agency side to handle Total Market

The 2016 Hispanic CMO will be published on October 10, 2016 during the ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Conference:

  • The supplement will be FREE to readers and is published digital to ensure additional pass along.
  • HispanicAd.com will promote heavily.
  • The 2015 Hispanic CMO published in November 2015 has delivered +7,000 download to date.
  • To read the 2015 edition CLICK HERE.

Sponsorship:

Participating Sponsor – 1 FP Hispanic CMO showcase section  – $3,500 net

For more information contact:

Gene Bryan at gbryan@hispanicad.com or 917-854-1706

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P&G’s ‘Retro’ Move: A Canadian Translation For Mr. Clean

By Adam R Jacobson

In 1958, Mr. Clean made its debut as a household cleaning brand. Six months after its first radio and TV campaign, it became a top brand and entered the Canadian market.

Now, in a nod to its first creative effort, the Procter & Gamble Co. brand is bringing back its original Mr. Clean jingle in both Spanish and English in the form of a new spot.

Both :30 and :15-second versions are available to radio and TV, and as pre-roll in cinemas and digital video providers.

The English-language spot shows various household scenes in which Mr. Clean takes care of messes: A dad is wiping off a child’s illustration from a white living room wall; a male roommate cleans the countertop of his apartment with his buddy giving Mr. Clean a high five; a daughter playing in her doll house is seen with her mother singing Mr. Clean’s praises; a woman with numerous pets is shown mopping with Mr. Clean; a heavy metal band sings a refrain of the jingle; an African-American woman opens the shower curtain to find her husband scrubbing the bathroom tub with Mr. Clean; a man is bathing in a tub (likely not filled with the household cleaner), in a clean bathroom; a mom is seen with a baby dressed like Mr. Clean on a kitchen counter; a Latina entering an attic space where Mr. Clean is happily singing; a glimpse of the original 1959 commercial; and a neighborhood shot featuring all of the happy family members seen previously.

Both the :30 and :15 were created by Leo Burnett Canada and produced by Skin and Bones, Against All Odds, Eggplant Productions and The Big Picture.

The Spanish-language spot is identical, with a Spanish-language version of the jingle accompanied by in-language on-screen messaging.

Kevin Wenzel, who serves as P&G’s Associate Brand Director for North America, did not directly address his company’s decision to go with a translation when asked by Hispanic Market Overview.

He tells Hispanic Market Overview that the spot “is a celebration of the brand’s heritage designed to appeal to today’s ever-changing modern demographic.” He adds that his team discovered that there was “something magical” in the original 1958 jingle. “We then recognized that there was a uniquely ownable and relatable campaign in the jingle that could span not only generations, but demographics, so we explored modernizing it,” Wenzel says.

P&G’s decision to go with a translated spot for Mr. Clean’s “retro” campaign comes following the debut earlier this week of new creative for sister brand Old Spice featuring a relatively unknown Mexican actor and model that P&G hopes will resonate with Hispanic millennials. That spot was shot in English.

A representative of Citizen Relations, which handles public relations for Mr. Clean, notes that Publicis’ Leo Burnett and its Hispanic market specialty shop Lapiz maintain the Hispanic advertising assignments for the Mr. Clean brand.

Yet as of August 2014, Lapiz chiefly worked on P&G brands Always, Gain, Clearblue and Vidal Sassoon.

In 2010 Lapiz won two Golden Lions in Cannes for its Spanish-language radio spots produced for P&G’s Bounty brand — “Battle.”

 

HMO BackTalk: Old Spice Gets A Red Card For Bad Ad

Paging Jim Stengel.

You wouldn’t approve of this garbage, would you?

In case you have no clue who Jim Stengel is, this legendary marketer served as Procter & Gamble Co.‘s Global Marketing Officer until fall 2008, when he spoke in Orlando, Fla. at the ANA Masters of Marketing Conference and announced his “retirement.”

Back then, P&G — as it is today — was the No. 1 advertiser in both Hispanic media and non-Hispanic media.

A plethora of P&G brands dominated Hispanic print, Hispanic TV and Hispanic digital.

That’s why the June 29 launch of P&G brand Old Spice‘s latest campaign — Smell ‘Em Who’s Boss — is so alarming and insulting to multicultural advertising and marketing professionals.

This marketing campaign, developed by Portland, Ore.-based Wieden+Kennedy, “humorously” illustrates the “transformational” powers of Old Spice Swagger and Desperado scents, in addition to Old Spice Hair (Shampoo), putting guys in the driver’s seat of pure unadulterated confidence.

As the scent of confidence, anything is possible with Old Spice.

This evidently includes bad spots.

My latest Red Card goes to Old Spice, which joins Tecate in providing “insult my consumer” creative.

Like Tecate, this spot was created and produced by mainly non-Latinos. With the Old Spice spots we have — count ’em — one Latino: Assistant Editor Zaldy Lopez.

Old Spice excitedly introduced the spots by noting that two of the four spots seek to target Hispanic millennials and introduces the first Mexican actor to be featured in an Old Spice spot — Alberto Cardenas.

Hear those crickets chirping? Me too.

We’ve done some research and we can firm that this individual is not the Alberto Cardenas who serves as a partner in the law firm of Squire Patton Boggs and in the Advocacy Group at Cardenas Partners.

This Alberto Cardenas is also not the former governor of Jalisco, Mexico and PAN Senator until his 2012 departure from politics.

Aside from a Google search that shows he may be a Mexican model, I’ve never heard of this guy.

To view the “hilarious and surreal” Desperado spot featuring Mr. Cardenas, click here: Wieden+Kennedy Old Spice Spot

This will be gracing the airwaves this summer, and we certainly hope that the budget put toward this did not reduce any sort of effort targeting Hispanics who consume Spanish-language media. If so, that would be a hugely disconcerting move and send a very wrong message to all CMOs, brand managers, media buyers and media planners.

This is not Hispanic advertising. This is a spot that seems perfectly geared to young men who enjoy watching Spike or similar “tune in, turn off and vegetate” television networks.

In late July I’ll be in Portland and I’m tempted to drop a Red Card in the lobby for Creative Director Max Stinson, or perhaps another one of the W+K team such as Client Contact Janine Miletec.

But maybe they aren’t the ones that deserve the Red Card. Perhaps it is the successor to James Moorhead, who departed as CMO for Old Spice in spring 2012 to become CMO for Dish Network and can now be found at Metromile, which is “revolutionizing” the car insurance experience with pay-per-mile pricing. Or, is it the successor to John Sebastian, who exited as P&G Marketing Director-North America Personal Care in September 2015 to join Newell Rubbermaid as VP/GM?

Whoever the new “wolf dog” is running the marketing for Old Spice better sit and learn a new trick, because Desperado is a desperate attempt to effectively attract the Latino consumer.

Yes, JC Harvey. We’re talking to you.

Can Multicultural Agencies Be The Best ‘Relationship Shops’?

 

HMO BACKtalk – The Chat Spot For Multicultural Marketers and Advertisers

On April 5, advertising industry executives received a jolting wake-up call that no matter how “solid” their relationship may be with a long-term client, a split could nevertheless happen.

After 46 years with Twin Cities-based shop Haworth Marketing & Media, Target Corp. confirmed that it was shifting its media and planning business—valued at $686.3 million—to WPP-owned GroupM.

The news resonated strongly with such key multicultural agency heads as Alex Lopez Negrete, of Lopez Negrete Communications.

But, journalists at Advertising Age covering the story neglected to rewind the clock to early 2011. That’s when Target Corp. sent a break-up notice to 50-person Minneapolis-based independent agency Peterson Milla Hooks (PMH). For Target, it was simply a consolidation move, with the work shifting to Wieden + Kennedy.

For PMH President Tom Nowack, it was a jarring jolt.

“We were fired,” Nowack told the Minneapolis Star-Tribune in an April 2013 interview. “We weren’t bitter, but it was difficult. It was a long relationship that we were really proud of and loved. Almost all of our [agency] income was from Target. It was a devastating blow.”

Recovery, or collapse, from the loss of a major client is a fact of life for advertising agency executives and their employees.

But, what if an agency were to take control of the relationship, steering a path with miles ahead while serving as the trusted, needed and necessary partner committed to brand growth and strong ROI?

That’s an opportunity multicultural shops should immediately capitalize on.

As a key “Relationship Shop,” the agency that can expertly guide a brand manager or CMO on a successful total market campaign wins. By taking the lead, and not direction, it also sends the message that the “multicultural marketer” is simply a segment marketer embedded in an American mainstream that will continue to evolve and embrace different heritages, races and cultural touchpoints.

Are any Hispanic advertising agencies already succeeding as a “Relationship Shop”?

Are any agencies losing the battle between client and agency, with the flow of directives coming in a one-way direction?

With fragile relationships in place and dollars the bottom line, perhaps a one-way flow of activity is better than none.

It’s not. It’s a dangerous route that puts talent in peril of job loss.

Take the lead. Make the suggestions. Offer ideas. Inspire your client.

Do this every day.

This could stop you from thinking about the horrors of losing your biggest client and start thinking about how important your team is to them, now and for always.

 

ARJ

 

Total Market Advertising: Where Budgets Trump Insights?

HMO BACKtalk – The Chat Spot For Multicultural Marketers and Advertisers

In the recently released Hispanic Market Overview 2016, presented by Lopez Negrete Communications, I skewered Saatchi & Saatchi New York for their recently released “Born Bold” total market campaign for Baja California-based beer brand Tecate.

Not too long ago, Tecate positioned itself as a beer for the working class Latino, and the first-generation Mexican man who deserved a cold Tecate after a hard day of work, and providing for the family.

Now, Tecate is using swagger in an attempt to win over the millennial male with “flavor that can’t be tamed” and the use of a boxer and a soccer referee.

Attention CMOs and Brand Managers: Is this the worst example of how “total market tactics” can result in work that employs shortcuts and cost efficiency rather than consumer insights to help grow a brand?

  1. The core audience that made Tecate a valued brand in the U.S. has just been tossed aside.
  2. The almighty millennial is now the target, and what better way to get all millennials is there than to “give a nod” to Latinos by throwing in something like a Hispanic boxer!

I’m pulling out the Red Card on Tecate.

What other brands deserve a Red Card? Let’s hand them out now, so decision-makers don’t make the choice of putting the budget ahead of research and true solutions for long-term brand growth.

Adam R Jacobson

SCHRAMM MARKETING GROUP LAUNCHES FANTÁSTICO

Schramm Marketing Group today announced the upcoming June launch of its newest venture, Fantástico, the free, hyper-local, mobile-optimized site that provides Latino consumers with a ticket purchasing experience that is entirely in Spanish from homepage to checkout. The website will launch first in the New York metro area atwww.Fantastico.nyc to cater to the region’s large Hispanic community in the nation’s sports and entertainment capital.

 

Fantástico’s business model blends ticket resale and brokerage with original and branded editorial content to best engage the avidly mobile U.S. Hispanic consumer. The site offers free online access to ticket sales and information about sports, entertainment, movies, concerts, live performances, exhibitions, as well as family events and destinations – entirely in Spanish.  Soon, Fantástico will provide Spanish-language information about pay-per-view and feature select VOD, digital video, and local television programming.

 

The platform’s content and advertising is targeted to feature local area events under a regionally-specific domain in each market. While the promotional focus is on local events, consumers can easily purchase tickets in Spanish to thousands of events, nationwide, using Fantástico’s easy-to-navigate event category and event title search capabilities. Fantástico allows brands, venues, and programmers to market their unique entertainment experiences to the mobile Hispanic consumer in the same seamless platform.

 

“For over two decades, Schramm Marketing Group has been at the forefront of multicultural marketing. We’ve leveraged our extensive relationships and partnerships with sports and entertainment entities to provide U.S. Hispanics greater access to the most popular events,” said Joe Schramm, Founder and Managing Partner, Schramm Marketing Group. “Fantástico is a natural progression for our business by leveraging the popularity of smartphone ownership among Latinos.  The site allows us to continue providing our expertise to brands, advertisers, programmers, and program providers, while also connecting Latino consumers with the experiences and content they want, on the devices they use, and in the language they speak.”

 

“Sports and entertainment are two major passions for U.S. Hispanics” said Rafael Eli, Partner, Schramm Marketing Group. “In the past 23 years, we have attracted sold-out crowds of Latino soccer fans to many of the country’s top venues in the largest Hispanic markets. Yet, our team has identified a serious void in the ticket-buying experience – none of the leading online ticket outlets offers Hispanics an option for getting tickets on mobile that is completely in Spanish. The process may start in Spanish, but currently, the check-out reverts to English.  Fantástico is the solution.”

 

The popularity of smartphones among Latinos has demanded an evolution in the way these consumers buy tickets online. The introduction of smartphones created a paradigm shift in the marketplace, providing Hispanics an affordable and convenient option for accessing the internet. Today, Hispanics over-index for ownership of smartphones and use their smartphone as their primary or only access to the internet. While Hispanics are 17% of the population, they buy about 25% of all movie tickets sold, according to the Motion Pictures Association of America. Hispanics also are the most enthusiastic supporters of soccer and baseball, have historically comprised the most consistent base of boxing pay-per-view buyers, and are very likely to attend shows and events as a family or group. As a free, mobile-optimized ticket and content site entirely in Spanish, Fantástico was specifically designed with statistics like these in mind to best serve the Hispanic community.