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It’s Here: HISPANIC CMO Thought Leaders 2017

Hispanic Market Overview is proud to announce the Nov. 6, 2017 distribution of Hispanic CMO — Hispanic Thought Leaders 2017

This report, produced by The Adam R Jacobson Consultancy and Hispanic Market Overview, is distributed exclusively by HispanicCMO.com and HispanicAd, the multicultural marketing and advertising industry’s information leader.

This year’s report features 10 outstanding individuals who have been honored as 2017 Hispanic Thought Leaders.

The 10 2017 Hispanic Thought Leaders profiled in the fourth annual Hispanic CMO special report have demonstrated brand strength and commitment to best practices with respect to Total Market approaches, digital and social media initiatives, and efforts targeted to not only millennials but all consumers, with ideas rooted in or successfully integrated into Hispanic marketing and advertising activities.

Respected Hispanic market expert Gilbert Dávila, president and CEO of Dávila Multicultural Insights, served as the curator of the 2017 Hispanic Thought Leaders list, working with a team of industry professionals and HispanicAd in singling out these individuals based on their contributions to Hispanic marketing and advertising.

This is not a ranking, as was the case with the Hispanic Thought Leaders reports in 2014 and 2015. Individuals are honored in alphabetical order; we salute their achievements equally.

The 2017 Hispanic CMO Hispanic Thought Leaders report also features a FIRSTTHOUGHT feature on Michael Lacorazza, who leads the development of scaled, integrated marketing campaigns for Wells Fargo Bank.

To view this year’s report, visit HispanicAd.com from Monday, Nov. 6.

Past editions of the Hispanic Thought Leaders report are also available for download at no charge, thanks to our sponsors.

Participating Sponsors

AARP

Ad Castells

Anomaly

Azteca America

C-Com Group

d expósito & partners

Entravision Communications

ESPN Deportes

Eventus

Grupo Gallegos

Hispanicize

Orci

Pandora

Richards / Lerma

Sprint

St. Jude

Telemundo

Hispanic Thought Leaders 2016 Report Released

The 2016 Hispanic CMO Hispanic Thought Leaders white paper,  produced by Adam R Jacobson exclusively from HispanicAd.com, is now available for free download at HispanicCMO.com.

This year’s report again tackles the topic of “total market” — and how our honored thought leaders have changed how they accomplish their goals both through internal restructurings of the marketing and brand management teams, and from a reimagining of how multicultural agencies influence and direct a brand’s overall message.

Our eight Thought Leaders are champions of Hispanic marketing, singled out by a team of professionals led by Gilbert Dávila, Chair of the ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Committee.

The report opens with a report on “total market” reaction, and action, on the agency level. We speak with Alma Co-President/COO Isaac Mizrahi and López Negrete Communications founder and President/CEO Alex López Negrete to get their unique views on how their respective shops have embraced — or rejected — “total market” approaches. López Negrete is especially vehement in his opposition to “total market” techniques seen in recent years.

The 2016 Hispanic CMO Thought Leaders Report is presented by López Negrete Communications.

The release of the 2016 Hispanic CMO Thought Leaders Report is tied to the ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Conference, 18th annual ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Conference, presented by Time Inc. The event is October 9-10, at the JW Marriott Los Angeles at L.A. Live.

Can Multicultural Agencies Be The Best ‘Relationship Shops’?

 

HMO BACKtalk – The Chat Spot For Multicultural Marketers and Advertisers

On April 5, advertising industry executives received a jolting wake-up call that no matter how “solid” their relationship may be with a long-term client, a split could nevertheless happen.

After 46 years with Twin Cities-based shop Haworth Marketing & Media, Target Corp. confirmed that it was shifting its media and planning business—valued at $686.3 million—to WPP-owned GroupM.

The news resonated strongly with such key multicultural agency heads as Alex Lopez Negrete, of Lopez Negrete Communications.

But, journalists at Advertising Age covering the story neglected to rewind the clock to early 2011. That’s when Target Corp. sent a break-up notice to 50-person Minneapolis-based independent agency Peterson Milla Hooks (PMH). For Target, it was simply a consolidation move, with the work shifting to Wieden + Kennedy.

For PMH President Tom Nowack, it was a jarring jolt.

“We were fired,” Nowack told the Minneapolis Star-Tribune in an April 2013 interview. “We weren’t bitter, but it was difficult. It was a long relationship that we were really proud of and loved. Almost all of our [agency] income was from Target. It was a devastating blow.”

Recovery, or collapse, from the loss of a major client is a fact of life for advertising agency executives and their employees.

But, what if an agency were to take control of the relationship, steering a path with miles ahead while serving as the trusted, needed and necessary partner committed to brand growth and strong ROI?

That’s an opportunity multicultural shops should immediately capitalize on.

As a key “Relationship Shop,” the agency that can expertly guide a brand manager or CMO on a successful total market campaign wins. By taking the lead, and not direction, it also sends the message that the “multicultural marketer” is simply a segment marketer embedded in an American mainstream that will continue to evolve and embrace different heritages, races and cultural touchpoints.

Are any Hispanic advertising agencies already succeeding as a “Relationship Shop”?

Are any agencies losing the battle between client and agency, with the flow of directives coming in a one-way direction?

With fragile relationships in place and dollars the bottom line, perhaps a one-way flow of activity is better than none.

It’s not. It’s a dangerous route that puts talent in peril of job loss.

Take the lead. Make the suggestions. Offer ideas. Inspire your client.

Do this every day.

This could stop you from thinking about the horrors of losing your biggest client and start thinking about how important your team is to them, now and for always.

 

ARJ

 

SBS/Miami Plots New Route For WXDJ As ‘Romanic Rhythmic’ I-95 Hits The Airwaves

BY ADAM R JACOBSON

MIAMI — In a widely rumored move, Miami-based Hispanic media company SBS on Monday completed its transition of WXDJ-FM’s “El Zol” Tropical format to 100,000-watt powerhouse WRMA-FM by debuting on WXDJ what may be best-described as a hybrid Tropical/Spanish Contemporary format under the moniker “I-95” – pronounced “Eee-Noventa-y-Cinco.”

With a slogan promoting itself as the home for “ritmo romántico de Miami,” I-95 features a wide mix of current and recent Tropical and Spanish Contemporary hits.  The 6pm hour included songs from Prince Royce, Alejandro Sanz, Aventura, Chino & Nacho, Fonseca, Chayanne and Ricardo Arjona, among other artists. Popular English-language ballads can also be found on I-95, including Miley Cyrus’ “Wrecking Ball,” Pink’s “Just Give Me a Reason” and Aerosmith’s “I Don’t Want to Miss a Thing.” Reflecting Miami’s penchant for dance music, the 7pm hour also featured the popular nightclub track “Levels,” by Avicii. Other artists heard on I-95 include Spanish pop superstars Juanes and Maná.

I-95 is presently absent of air personalities and is commercial-free, with the focus on the station’s new musical direction, which incorporates elements of WRMA’s long-time “Romance” Spanish Adult Contemporary format with some of the English-language Top 40 hits aired on its successor presentation, “DJ106.7.” I-95’s 40,000-watt signal is centered in Miami-Dade County and enjoys city-grade coverage over southern Broward County, which has gained a considerable number of Latino residents in recent years.

Interestingly, it’s not the first time that a radio station in Miami has paid homage to one of the region’s busiest highways by using the “I-95” name. In the early 1980s, WINZ-FM battled WHYI-FM “Y-100” as a high-energy Top 40 that served as South Florida’s first home for the burgeoning rap and freestyle dance product that would later define longtime player WPOW-FM “Power 96.” WINZ-FM is now Clear Channel’s Spanish Contemporary WMGE-FM “Mega 94.9.”

With the debut of I-95, WRMA is now the sole home for “El Zol,” which takes a greater focus on bachata, merengue and much of the reggaetón-infused Latin Pop found on Spanish Contemporary stations across the eastern U.S. and Puerto Rico. The shift of El Zol to the 106.7 FM frequency ended a roughly 16-month run for “DJ106.7,” which featured noted Miami-based talent DJ Laz in morning drive and English-language pop music with Spanish-language commercials. The DJ106.7 presentation replaced Romance in July 2012.

The move to the bigger 106.7 FM frequency for El Zol has already improved SBS’s fortunes in the Nielsen Audio ratings for Miami-Fort Lauderdale. In December 2013, WXDJ cracked the top 10 by capturing a 3.9 share of all radio listeners, regardless of language –placing it behind only Univision Radio’s Spanish Adult Contemporary WAMR “Amor 107.5” in the battle for supremacy among Miami’s Spanish-language stations. WXDJ had a 2.8 share in October 2013, jumping past Univision Radio’s Spanish Contemporary WRTO “Mix 98” in December.

Univision Radio Offers ‘Good, Bad & Ugly’ As Post-Piolin Solution

DECEMBER 2, 2013 – Los Angeles – More than four months after Univision Radio confirmed the surprisingly abrupt departure from Univision Radio of Eddie “Piolin” Sotelo, the company today unveiled the program that will replace Piolin at its regional Mexican flagship KSCA-FM “La 101.9” in Los Angeles–but not on Piolin’s former Texas affiliates.

Univision Radio has paired KLNO-FM “La Que Buena” on-air personality Raul Molinar (known on the station as “El Primo”) with La 101.9 afternoon host Andres Maldonado (known on-air as “El Feo”) and Silvia del Valle, who joins Univision after a year with Glendale, CA-based Media Latino Communications’ La Numero Uno Network.

However, del Valle is perhaps best-known for her stint in middays at SBS’s regional Mexican KLAX-FM “97.9 La Raza” in Los Angeles as “La Bronca.” In that role, her program was simulcast on KRZZ-FM “La Raza 93.3” in San Francisco and on now-defunct WRAZ-FM “La Raza” in the Miami suburb of Homestead, Fla. Del Valle also found a national television audience through her role as a judge on Azteca America’s Quiero Ser Grupero competition show.

In Los Angeles the trio hit the air this morning in the 6-10am slot as “El Bueno, La Mala, y El Feo.” It is believed that the hosts will not use their previous on-air nicknames.

But the show, which already has a Facebook and Twitter social media presence and is using the “BMF Show” name as its unofficial shorthand name, will not replace Piolin in Houston, San Antonio, El Paso and the Rio Grande Valley. Rather, the trio’s new program will air in the 11am-3pm slot on KLTN-FM 102.9, KROM-FM 92.9, KBNA-FM 97.5, and KGBT-FM 98.5, respectively.

Univision Radio regional Mexican stations in Chicago, Dallas, San Francisco, San Diego, Phoenix, Fresno, Las Vegas, Austin and Albuquerque will also add “El Bueno, La Mala, y El Feo.” But Univision was coy on when the program would debut and did not note what time slot it would take in these markets.

In prepared comments, Univision Radio EVP/Content & Entertainment Evan Harrison–a Clear Channel exec who exited in spring 2011 as Clear Channel Radio EVP and digital president for the Chief Creative Officer role at VanWagner– noted, “As our audiences’ preferences continue to evolve, we need to find new and creative ways to entertain and engage them. El Bueno, La Mala, y el Feo is the answer. This incredibly dynamic team will really resonate with regional Mexican music lovers who also enjoy real people they can relate to.”

While Harrison is upbeat about the new program, Univision Radio has a tremendous challenge ahead as it attempts to recoup from steep ratings declines at many of the stations that once aired Piolin. According to Inside Radio analysis of Nielsen Audio data from July to September, a morning drive decrease in 25-54 share of a stunning 58% was seen at Univision’s KHOT-FM “La Nueva 105.9” in Phoenix, which now ranks eight-tenths of a share behind Entravision’s KLNZ-FM “Tricolor 103.5” in the overall ratings.

Similarly, Univision Radio’s KLNV-FM 106.5 in San Diego experienced a morning drive drop in 25-54 share of 54% between July and September 2013, Inside Radio reports. In Dallas, where Molinar has been based, KLNO lost 43% of its 25-54 morning drive share and 37% in total week. However, KLNO received a new competitor four days after Piolin left in KMVK-FM, which CBS Radio flipped from Spanish CHR to regional Mexican as “La Grande 107.5.”

It is also unclear why del Valle will apparently not be taking to Univision Radio airwaves as “La Bronca,” as she is known to legions of regional Mexican radio listeners in the Golden State. While using the name at KLAX, del Valle was sandwiched between then-morning host Renan Almendarez Coello’s El Cucuy de la Manana and an afternoon program hosted by El Mandril.

Interestingly, El Mandril–like Piolin–is also off of L.A. airwaves. However, the reason for the disappearance of El Mandril is hazy amid allegations first reported by La Opinion newspaper of Los Angeles that he or one of his associates is tied to a ratings manipulation claim under investigation by Nielsen Audio with the cooperation of KLAX owner SBS.

In Los Angeles, El Bueno, La Mala, y El Feo will seek to attract regional Mexican radio listeners in a market where Liberman Broadcasting’s “Que Buena” has capitalized on the presence of Don Cheto in morning drive throughout the disruptions at KSCA and KLAX.

Adam R Jacobson, reporting from Miami

 

Experiential Marketing, Miami Style: Lincoln Leads Tours Of Wynwood

I’ve not taken to blogging much as of late. However, I was moved to provide the advertising world with a first-hand account of an experiential marketing effort currently underway in Miami’s Wynwood Art District that takes social media to the streets of the city’s hippest neighborhood in an effort to shatter stereotypes and connect an automotive brand to an upscale, hip — and Millennial-driven — consumer group.

My father received last week an invitation from Lincoln Motor Company to participate in its “Hello, Again” Tour — a one-hour experience that allows locals to “rediscover” Wynwood … from the driver’s seat of a 2013 Lincoln MKZ. He passed along the invitation to me.

I wasn’t sure what to expect. In the past, such events have put the focus on the car while using hip locales or “tours” as an excuse to draw people to a hard sell on a vehicle they may know little about and may have no desire to purchase within the next six months. This experience was the exact opposite.

Although the "Hello, Again" tour may immediately bring to mind Neil Diamond or the biggest fans of The Cars, automaker Lincoln is taking to the streets of Miami's Wynwood Art District to appeal to Millennials with money.

Upon arrival at SoHo Studios Pavilion, I was greeted by a young Lincoln representative from Silicon Valley who chatted about life in Miami compared to California and then offered me an iced coffee courtesy of local retailer Panther Coffee.

He then politely invited me to look around the studio, which had a fully loaded MKZ prominently displayed yet was nevertheless meshed into museumesque presentations on Panther Coffee, Wynwood Cigar Company (a highlight of our tour), and a local restauranteur known for his culinary delights at Coral Gables’ La Cofradia who is opening a restaurant in Wynwood soon.

I was not handed a sleek brochure with pics of the MKZ and specs. I was not pressured into completing a potential buyers’ survey.

After 10 minutes, a couple of under-40 women arrived, in addition to a 20-something woman with flaming auburn hair and her Latino boyfriend. Our Lincoln representative then invited us to select from one of four MKZs, get behind the wheel, and begin our tour. Walkie-talkies in each car directed us to various street murals, a drive-through art exhibit, and the Wynwood Cigar Factory, where I actually got to roll a cigar. Clearly, Lincoln was taking a very subtle approach to marketing its car.

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A few minutes later we were again on our way. As we returned to our vehicles, the Lincoln rep pointed out one mural that was “completed” by having an MKZ parked right in front of it. OK, there’s the marketing pitch … but then we drove off and continued our driving tour.

We drove back to the Pavilion and concluded our tour with another individual from Lincoln available to answer any questions we had about the MKZ. We were not given a presentation — again, it was consumer-driven, and put the individual in control of how much or how little they wanted to learn about Lincoln Motor Company and the fully loaded sedan we’d spent the last hour in.

The Lincoln MKZ, with museum-like presentations of Panther Coffee and Wynwood Cigar Company in the background
The Lincoln MKZ, with museum-like presentations of Panther Coffee and Wynwood Cigar Company in the background

Truth be told, it worked.

I was the one to make the most comments, and ask the most questions. I marveled over the AC coming up from below the seat cushion — an odd feeling at first as cool air blew up to my rump. I spent a few minutes trying to navigate the push button media center that included Sirius Satellite Radio and the ability to connect a smartphone or MP3 player via USB port or Bluetooth. I couldn’t figure out how to use the HD Radio tuner; in the 3-series BMW it’s pretty easy to go to KROQ-HD2 to pull up the Roq of the ’80s channel when in L.A.

I requested a brochure, which is standard at all of the L.A. Auto Shows and Miami Auto Shows I’ve attended in the last decade or so. No luck: To promote its Green efforts that include the use of a soy substance in creating its leather seating (not clear what this was when it was explained to me), Lincoln wasn’t handing out anything. Again, the automaker wanted us to have a nice leisurely experience in Wynwood. Period. If we wanted to learn more about Lincoln, we could request it.

A young woman representing Lincoln then gave the attendees an iPad open to a survey that asked some basic questions about our experience driving a Lincoln: Would we be in the market for a new automobile within the next year? What was our opinion of the car? What was our opinion of Lincoln? Would we recommend Lincoln? Did we want information emailed to us about the MKZ or other Lincoln models?

And that was pretty much it, except for our thank-you gift: a 1/2 pound of Brazilian coffee from Panther Coffee or a box of hand-rolled cigars from Wynwood Cigar Factory (I opted for the coffee).

In a world  where social media is now a major part of a marketer’s outreach efforts, Lincoln succeeded in bringing its Facebook and Twitter-based interactivity with consumers to the streets. It was a great example of Experiential 2.0 — taking the auto show experience, marrying it with the street fair (think Calle Ocho, Fiesta Broadway or the successful fan festivals that Soccer United Marketing puts on prior to its international soccer friendlies), and then deconstructing it so that the brand is not so much the protagonist but never leaves the stage.

Will I purchase a Lincoln MKZ now that I’ve spent an hour driving one? That’s not the point. The point is Lincoln connected with me in a way that could never have been done in an auto show, or street fair, or automotive dealer.

 

Lincoln sets up for its after-dark meeting place: Panther Coffee in the heart of Miami's hip Wynwood Art District

This is also notable for its success in attracting the Millennial — the consumer group that marketers are gushing over, especially in the Hispanic world. If anyone still associates Lincoln with its 1970s-style Continentals and retirees in Palm Beach County who enjoy golf and delicatessens, they’re very much out of touch with where the brand sits today. The Lincoln Navigator is a premium choice among moms; now the MKZ seeks to be the premium choice for the 3-series BMW consumer.

Finally, the decision by Lincoln Motor Company to bring its “Hello, Again Tour” to a hub of bilingual, bicultural Hispanic Millennials is noteworthy in and of itself. Lincoln may wish to follow up its tour with marketing efforts that use digital, social and mobile media targeting Hispanic Millennials, in addition to traditional media such as television, radio, and out-of-home. The results could prove highly beneficial for a brand that is not only reinventing itself, but how to reach its next generation of automobile buyers.