Tag Archives: Hispanic marketing

Univision S.F. Secures A New News Anchor

A news anchor with two decades of experience in Los Angeles has been tapped to help the 6pm and 11pm weeknight newscasts at Univision’s KDTV-14 in the San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose DMA.

Taking the role is Palmira Pérez, who Univision Bay Area VP/Regional News Director Carolina Nuñez calls “a trusted journalist with a vast experience of giving voice to our community and covering the topics affecting Latinos in California and in our nation.”

Pérez formerly anchored the 5pm and 10pm newscasts on Spanish-language unaffiliated station KWHY-22, presently owned by Meruelo Media; Pérez was part of the MundoMax team, and prior to that with MundoFox, at KWHY. In fact, Pérez had been with KWHY since July 2001, starting as a reporter.

Peréz is a native of Mexico and holds a law degree from Universidad de Guadalajara.

Available Now: Your Complete Hispanic TV Upfront Outlook!

The Adam R Jacobson Consultancy, in partnership with HispanicAd.com, is pleased to announce the availability of the 2017 Hispanic TV Upfront Report.

french film festivalThis comprehensive guide, distributed exclusively by HispanicAd, offers readers a total look at the programs and trends shaping Hispanic-targeted broadcast and pay-TV networks serving Latino viewers across the U.S.

To view and download,  CLICK HERE.

Interviews with key executives from the leading networks will focus on what the big new shows are, how sports programming still draws huge audiences of both men and women, and why Spanish-language programming will continue to remain important for the next generation of Hispanic TV consumers.

The 2017 Hispanic TV Upfront Report is a specially produced electronically-delivered supplement to the regular HispanicAd.com weekly newsletter.


To read and download last year’s report CLICK HERE.

Did Jose Villa Just Kill Your Business?

In a declaration distributed over the Thanksgiving holiday — appropriately, on Black Friday — José Villa, President of Los Angeles-based digital cross-cultural agency Sensis put another dagger into the fragile heart of U.S. Hispanic marketing.

Via the widely read MediaPost blog, Villa made the audacious proclamation that “Millennials and Gen Z are the Hispanic market.”

Using Geoscape data, a pie chart showed the following:

  •  Millennials now comprise 29% of the U.S. Hispanic population
  • Generation Z is now 36% of the U.S Hispanic population

That’s right. Some 65% of the Hispanic population falls into this group.

So, it’s natural for a digital guy who needs business to put marketer focus on this digitally savvy group, and hype up bilingual, bicultural blah-blah while ignoring some simple statistics that continue to get ignored by agenda-driven  business leaders.

  1. Who has the greatest amount of disposable income?
  2. Who depends more on Hispanic (i.e. Spanish-language media) than any other Latino group?

I challenge you to put “Gen Z” and “Millennials” as one of your top 3 answers.

Ladies and gentlemen, we are at a crossroads as an industry ready to tear itself apart over the digital revolution, increased use of English as a preferred language (but not an exclusive one), and advertisers who still only know what we as an industry tell them.

So let’s start telling them the truth and stop depending on agenda-driven save-my-business propaganda.

If not, the clients will be eating ostrich burgers with sofrito and adobo made from the contracts you lost.

Villa writes, “Most Hispanic marketing, however, is still focused on the 35% of older Hispanics and their Spanish-language media consumption.”

Well, did Villa ask perhaps why?

  1. The AARP Latino has far more disposable income. They are more likely to own or rent their own home. They likely spend more on travel, on health care, on clothing, on … well, just about anything.
  2. Older Hispanics are more dependent on Spanish-language media consumption. So, as a brand manager with a total marketing directive and limited budget, this would be more effective since younger Latinos can be reached on The CW and ABC, right?

Citing Nielsen and Kantar Media, Villa notes that 79% of major Hispanic media spend in 2015 went to TV (network + spot + cable) – “most of which went to Spanish-language broadcast and cable networks like Univision, Telemundo, ESPN Deportes and Discovery en Español.”

Here’s a serious question for you, José: Where else would be as wise as an investment in a total market world??

Villa continues about how the millennials aren’t getting their fair share of ad dollars, with regard to Hispanic efforts.

“While Millennials do watch Spanish TV, we know from our research that it is only a small part of their overall TV consumption – less than 1/3 of their average 15 hours of TV viewership per week. We also know that Hispanic Millennials and Gen Z spend most of their time consuming digital media. According to Simmons Connect (Spring 2016), digital makes up almost half – 47.3% – of Hispanic millennial media consumption on a weekly basis, or 45 hours per week! Yet almost 80% of Hispanic media spending goes to Spanish TV?”

As has been said many times in various ways, a Facebook “like” is not a sale.

We have put too much focus on millennials and Gen Z, a generation that has far less dollars than the Baby Boomers.

Yet we continue to be fixated on a Madison Avenue model that is stuck in the 1970s with respect to who the key target should be — first-time homebuyer, newlywed, baby on the way.

IN 1975 that could describe many a 27-year-old.

Today?

Give me a break.

“The reality is that the business of Hispanic marketing is still stuck in the past,” Villa writes.

That is incorrect. The entire U.S. marketing industry is stuck in the past by continuing to hyperfocus on a segment of consumers that may be trend-setting but aren’t the biggest spenders.

That must radically change if advertising agencies hope to stay relevant in the next five to 10 years. Otherwise, every major will have an in-house shop capable of doing the things you failed at in 2016.

Hispanic Thought Leaders 2016 Report Released

The 2016 Hispanic CMO Hispanic Thought Leaders white paper,  produced by Adam R Jacobson exclusively from HispanicAd.com, is now available for free download at HispanicCMO.com.

This year’s report again tackles the topic of “total market” — and how our honored thought leaders have changed how they accomplish their goals both through internal restructurings of the marketing and brand management teams, and from a reimagining of how multicultural agencies influence and direct a brand’s overall message.

Our eight Thought Leaders are champions of Hispanic marketing, singled out by a team of professionals led by Gilbert Dávila, Chair of the ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Committee.

The report opens with a report on “total market” reaction, and action, on the agency level. We speak with Alma Co-President/COO Isaac Mizrahi and López Negrete Communications founder and President/CEO Alex López Negrete to get their unique views on how their respective shops have embraced — or rejected — “total market” approaches. López Negrete is especially vehement in his opposition to “total market” techniques seen in recent years.

The 2016 Hispanic CMO Thought Leaders Report is presented by López Negrete Communications.

The release of the 2016 Hispanic CMO Thought Leaders Report is tied to the ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Conference, 18th annual ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Conference, presented by Time Inc. The event is October 9-10, at the JW Marriott Los Angeles at L.A. Live.

Third Edition of ‘Hispanic CMO’ Report Set For October

Hispanic Media Sales, Inc., publishers of HispanicAd.com, will publish the third edition of the highly successful and sought after Hispanic CMO.

We will be adding more “Thought Leadership” once again to this year’s edition.  We will interview the Top Hispanic CMOs with dedicated budgets and resources targeting the US Hispanic Consumer.

Gilbert Davila, a recognized and admired Hispanic Market expert, will curate the supplement.  Adam R Jacobson,publisher of the annual Hispanic Market Overview since 2010 and a U.S. Hispanic media expert will conduct the interviews and write the supplement.

The 2016 Hispanic CMO will tackle the key issues of the year:

  • How to measure effective and efficient ROI in the US Hispanic Market
  • Total Market and it’s positive and negative potential
  • Organizational Structure, both on the client and ad agency side to handle Total Market

The 2016 Hispanic CMO will be published on October 10, 2016 during the ANA Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Conference:

  • The supplement will be FREE to readers and is published digital to ensure additional pass along.
  • HispanicAd.com will promote heavily.
  • The 2015 Hispanic CMO published in November 2015 has delivered +7,000 download to date.
  • To read the 2015 edition CLICK HERE.

Sponsorship:

Participating Sponsor – 1 FP Hispanic CMO showcase section  – $3,500 net

For more information contact:

Gene Bryan at gbryan@hispanicad.com or 917-854-1706

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Spanish-language Digital Ticket Vendor Fantástico Set To Launch Inaugural Campaign

By Adam R Jacobson

Fantástico, which rolled out in June by multicultural marketing and promotions firm Schramm Marketing Group, will be rolling out an extensive out-of-home and experiential marketing campaign in parts of New York City next week.

The effort aims to promote Fantástico as a free, hyper-local Spanish-language portal providing users an alternative to platforms such as Ticketmaster, which are geared toward users who are comfortable with searching for events and making purchases in English.

Strategically placed advertisements will appear on select New York City Subway platforms, based on Hispanic population data, and on the No. 7 line, which connects Midtown Manhattan to Flushing, Queens and travels through what is now a heavily first-generation Hispanic borough. In recent years, Bud Light advertisements on the train line appeared in Spanish. Roosevelt Avenue, a major transit junction just south of LaGuardia Airport, is now heavily populated with Mexicans from Puebla state, in addition to Central Americans. The No. 7 line also travels to Citi Field, home of the New York Mets, and the tennis facilities used for the U.S. Open.

The subway ads will be accompanied by digital advertisements in key Hispanic media; specific platforms were not disclosed by Fantástico.

Street teams will also be employed to target Hispanic consumers and show them how the Fantástico platform works. These individuals are set to be deployed for New York Cosmos home matches at Hofstra University’s James M. Shuart Stadium, and at select Hispanic cultural and sporting events across the Tri-State area.

The Fantástico platform—www.Fantastico.nyc—is advertiser-supported, and advertising currently features a contest with weekly prizes of tickets to popular events.

“Our strategy is to communicate Fantástico’s message in places where our consumers are most likely to have a smartphone in their hand,” said Joe Schramm, founder of Schramm Marketing Group. “The campaign was designed to reach sports and entertainment fans where they live, work and commute and in their native language.”

Despite research that shows a diminishing number of Hispanics who only read Spanish, Fantástico does not have an English-language platform. As Schramm Marketing Group explains, Fantástico is designed to serve Spanish-dominant ticket buyers who have had to resort to waiting in line at a box office or in a local ‘tienda’ retailer to get tickets to an event.

Furthermore, Schramm Marketing Group claims Hispanic consumers contribute to a high drop-off rate in ticket transactions once they reach the English-only checkout page of all other ticket sites.

In comments made exclusively to Hispanic Market Overview, Schramm said, “There are a number of reasons for a Spanish-only site, but the most compelling is that there is a true business opportunity here to serve a consumer segment that is currently unserved by the leading online ticket retailers.”

He added, “Our years of experience in promoting ticket sales to Spanish-speaking Latinos showed us that there is a significant portion of ticket buyers who are uncomfortable making an online ticket transaction in English.  So, Spanish speakers must resort to buying tickets at the box office or from a local walk-in retailer. It is not very convenient, and denies them an equal opportunity to get the better choice of seats when tickets first go on sale.

“On the other hand, Bilingual Latinos who are comfortable with English have a wide variety of English-language options for online ticket transactions,” Schramm noted. “So, to have developed a bilingual site would have increased the number of competitors as well as the cost for marketing in two languages when, in fact, our core target provides us with enough potential customers to sustain a profitable business.  We simply looked at Spanish-language TV, radio and print media as a barometer of our potential success.”

P&G’s ‘Retro’ Move: A Canadian Translation For Mr. Clean

By Adam R Jacobson

In 1958, Mr. Clean made its debut as a household cleaning brand. Six months after its first radio and TV campaign, it became a top brand and entered the Canadian market.

Now, in a nod to its first creative effort, the Procter & Gamble Co. brand is bringing back its original Mr. Clean jingle in both Spanish and English in the form of a new spot.

Both :30 and :15-second versions are available to radio and TV, and as pre-roll in cinemas and digital video providers.

The English-language spot shows various household scenes in which Mr. Clean takes care of messes: A dad is wiping off a child’s illustration from a white living room wall; a male roommate cleans the countertop of his apartment with his buddy giving Mr. Clean a high five; a daughter playing in her doll house is seen with her mother singing Mr. Clean’s praises; a woman with numerous pets is shown mopping with Mr. Clean; a heavy metal band sings a refrain of the jingle; an African-American woman opens the shower curtain to find her husband scrubbing the bathroom tub with Mr. Clean; a man is bathing in a tub (likely not filled with the household cleaner), in a clean bathroom; a mom is seen with a baby dressed like Mr. Clean on a kitchen counter; a Latina entering an attic space where Mr. Clean is happily singing; a glimpse of the original 1959 commercial; and a neighborhood shot featuring all of the happy family members seen previously.

Both the :30 and :15 were created by Leo Burnett Canada and produced by Skin and Bones, Against All Odds, Eggplant Productions and The Big Picture.

The Spanish-language spot is identical, with a Spanish-language version of the jingle accompanied by in-language on-screen messaging.

Kevin Wenzel, who serves as P&G’s Associate Brand Director for North America, did not directly address his company’s decision to go with a translation when asked by Hispanic Market Overview.

He tells Hispanic Market Overview that the spot “is a celebration of the brand’s heritage designed to appeal to today’s ever-changing modern demographic.” He adds that his team discovered that there was “something magical” in the original 1958 jingle. “We then recognized that there was a uniquely ownable and relatable campaign in the jingle that could span not only generations, but demographics, so we explored modernizing it,” Wenzel says.

P&G’s decision to go with a translated spot for Mr. Clean’s “retro” campaign comes following the debut earlier this week of new creative for sister brand Old Spice featuring a relatively unknown Mexican actor and model that P&G hopes will resonate with Hispanic millennials. That spot was shot in English.

A representative of Citizen Relations, which handles public relations for Mr. Clean, notes that Publicis’ Leo Burnett and its Hispanic market specialty shop Lapiz maintain the Hispanic advertising assignments for the Mr. Clean brand.

Yet as of August 2014, Lapiz chiefly worked on P&G brands Always, Gain, Clearblue and Vidal Sassoon.

In 2010 Lapiz won two Golden Lions in Cannes for its Spanish-language radio spots produced for P&G’s Bounty brand — “Battle.”

 

Pulpo/ThinkNow: Nearly 3 In 4 Lower-Acculturated Hispanics Are Tablet Users

By Adam R Jacobson

Some 72% of lower-acculturated Hispanics are tablet owners who use the device to go online and access apps, making them more likely than acculturated Hispanics to use this type of device to access the internet.

 

That’s just one of the key findings revealed yesterday in a webinar presentation focused on the behavior of online Hispanics from Entravision Communications-owned Pulpo Media, a digital advertising platform.

 

Yet, acculturation is not a factor when it comes to the desire of mobile online Hispanics to download a Spanish-language app. According to Pulpo, which partnered with ThinkNow Research, all mobile online Hispanics would download a Spanish-language app.

 

Pulpo offered no insight into what type of Spanish-language app those surveyed would like on their tablet or smartphone. However, all Hispanics queried noted that game apps, social networking apps, and music apps were the most popular types to be downloaded. The types of apps downloaded the fewest number of time among the Hispanics surveyed include travel, sports and business.

 

While lower-acculturated Hispanics are most likely to use a tablet to access a mobile app, it should be noted that some 15.8 million tablet owners are mobile online users. This compares to some 27.6 million smartphone users who are mobile online users.

 

With some 46.3 million Hispanic mobile phone users, this illustrates a gap between what may be available to this consumer group and what is within their monthly budget for the services they wish to receive. Tablets offer easier online access to multiple family members, as the devices are more likely to be shared than a smartphone. The cost for going online could be tied to a home internet package, or access could be gained through a public wi-fi network. In contrast, smartphone use among some Hispanics could be through a pay-as-you-go service, therefore limiting the level of services available on their phones. Furthermore, some Hispanics may have data limits on their plan, and may not wish to deal with overage costs through the continued access of mobile online apps.

 

Early Prime The Right Time

 

While social media has determined that the hour just before lunch is the best time for marketers and PR professionals to reach people on Twitter and Facebook, Pulpo and ThinkNow research shows that the top app engagement time is between 6pm and 9pm.

 

No insight was presented as to why this time frame was the most popular for app users. However, it is likely that many Hispanics are using these devices pre- and post-dinner time to catch up on the news, information and entertainment they may have missed while on the job all day.

 

How many apps on average do Hispanics have on their mobile devices?

 

According to Pulpo and ThinkNow, Hispanic mobile online users average 29 total apps across all devices. Among Hispanic mobile online users aged 18-34, an average of 33 total apps can be found across all devices.