Tag Archives: CMO Hispanic

Did Jose Villa Just Kill Your Business?

In a declaration distributed over the Thanksgiving holiday — appropriately, on Black Friday — José Villa, President of Los Angeles-based digital cross-cultural agency Sensis put another dagger into the fragile heart of U.S. Hispanic marketing.

Via the widely read MediaPost blog, Villa made the audacious proclamation that “Millennials and Gen Z are the Hispanic market.”

Using Geoscape data, a pie chart showed the following:

  •  Millennials now comprise 29% of the U.S. Hispanic population
  • Generation Z is now 36% of the U.S Hispanic population

That’s right. Some 65% of the Hispanic population falls into this group.

So, it’s natural for a digital guy who needs business to put marketer focus on this digitally savvy group, and hype up bilingual, bicultural blah-blah while ignoring some simple statistics that continue to get ignored by agenda-driven  business leaders.

  1. Who has the greatest amount of disposable income?
  2. Who depends more on Hispanic (i.e. Spanish-language media) than any other Latino group?

I challenge you to put “Gen Z” and “Millennials” as one of your top 3 answers.

Ladies and gentlemen, we are at a crossroads as an industry ready to tear itself apart over the digital revolution, increased use of English as a preferred language (but not an exclusive one), and advertisers who still only know what we as an industry tell them.

So let’s start telling them the truth and stop depending on agenda-driven save-my-business propaganda.

If not, the clients will be eating ostrich burgers with sofrito and adobo made from the contracts you lost.

Villa writes, “Most Hispanic marketing, however, is still focused on the 35% of older Hispanics and their Spanish-language media consumption.”

Well, did Villa ask perhaps why?

  1. The AARP Latino has far more disposable income. They are more likely to own or rent their own home. They likely spend more on travel, on health care, on clothing, on … well, just about anything.
  2. Older Hispanics are more dependent on Spanish-language media consumption. So, as a brand manager with a total marketing directive and limited budget, this would be more effective since younger Latinos can be reached on The CW and ABC, right?

Citing Nielsen and Kantar Media, Villa notes that 79% of major Hispanic media spend in 2015 went to TV (network + spot + cable) – “most of which went to Spanish-language broadcast and cable networks like Univision, Telemundo, ESPN Deportes and Discovery en Español.”

Here’s a serious question for you, José: Where else would be as wise as an investment in a total market world??

Villa continues about how the millennials aren’t getting their fair share of ad dollars, with regard to Hispanic efforts.

“While Millennials do watch Spanish TV, we know from our research that it is only a small part of their overall TV consumption – less than 1/3 of their average 15 hours of TV viewership per week. We also know that Hispanic Millennials and Gen Z spend most of their time consuming digital media. According to Simmons Connect (Spring 2016), digital makes up almost half – 47.3% – of Hispanic millennial media consumption on a weekly basis, or 45 hours per week! Yet almost 80% of Hispanic media spending goes to Spanish TV?”

As has been said many times in various ways, a Facebook “like” is not a sale.

We have put too much focus on millennials and Gen Z, a generation that has far less dollars than the Baby Boomers.

Yet we continue to be fixated on a Madison Avenue model that is stuck in the 1970s with respect to who the key target should be — first-time homebuyer, newlywed, baby on the way.

IN 1975 that could describe many a 27-year-old.

Today?

Give me a break.

“The reality is that the business of Hispanic marketing is still stuck in the past,” Villa writes.

That is incorrect. The entire U.S. marketing industry is stuck in the past by continuing to hyperfocus on a segment of consumers that may be trend-setting but aren’t the biggest spenders.

That must radically change if advertising agencies hope to stay relevant in the next five to 10 years. Otherwise, every major will have an in-house shop capable of doing the things you failed at in 2016.

HMO BackTalk: Old Spice Gets A Red Card For Bad Ad

Paging Jim Stengel.

You wouldn’t approve of this garbage, would you?

In case you have no clue who Jim Stengel is, this legendary marketer served as Procter & Gamble Co.‘s Global Marketing Officer until fall 2008, when he spoke in Orlando, Fla. at the ANA Masters of Marketing Conference and announced his “retirement.”

Back then, P&G — as it is today — was the No. 1 advertiser in both Hispanic media and non-Hispanic media.

A plethora of P&G brands dominated Hispanic print, Hispanic TV and Hispanic digital.

That’s why the June 29 launch of P&G brand Old Spice‘s latest campaign — Smell ‘Em Who’s Boss — is so alarming and insulting to multicultural advertising and marketing professionals.

This marketing campaign, developed by Portland, Ore.-based Wieden+Kennedy, “humorously” illustrates the “transformational” powers of Old Spice Swagger and Desperado scents, in addition to Old Spice Hair (Shampoo), putting guys in the driver’s seat of pure unadulterated confidence.

As the scent of confidence, anything is possible with Old Spice.

This evidently includes bad spots.

My latest Red Card goes to Old Spice, which joins Tecate in providing “insult my consumer” creative.

Like Tecate, this spot was created and produced by mainly non-Latinos. With the Old Spice spots we have — count ’em — one Latino: Assistant Editor Zaldy Lopez.

Old Spice excitedly introduced the spots by noting that two of the four spots seek to target Hispanic millennials and introduces the first Mexican actor to be featured in an Old Spice spot — Alberto Cardenas.

Hear those crickets chirping? Me too.

We’ve done some research and we can firm that this individual is not the Alberto Cardenas who serves as a partner in the law firm of Squire Patton Boggs and in the Advocacy Group at Cardenas Partners.

This Alberto Cardenas is also not the former governor of Jalisco, Mexico and PAN Senator until his 2012 departure from politics.

Aside from a Google search that shows he may be a Mexican model, I’ve never heard of this guy.

To view the “hilarious and surreal” Desperado spot featuring Mr. Cardenas, click here: Wieden+Kennedy Old Spice Spot

This will be gracing the airwaves this summer, and we certainly hope that the budget put toward this did not reduce any sort of effort targeting Hispanics who consume Spanish-language media. If so, that would be a hugely disconcerting move and send a very wrong message to all CMOs, brand managers, media buyers and media planners.

This is not Hispanic advertising. This is a spot that seems perfectly geared to young men who enjoy watching Spike or similar “tune in, turn off and vegetate” television networks.

In late July I’ll be in Portland and I’m tempted to drop a Red Card in the lobby for Creative Director Max Stinson, or perhaps another one of the W+K team such as Client Contact Janine Miletec.

But maybe they aren’t the ones that deserve the Red Card. Perhaps it is the successor to James Moorhead, who departed as CMO for Old Spice in spring 2012 to become CMO for Dish Network and can now be found at Metromile, which is “revolutionizing” the car insurance experience with pay-per-mile pricing. Or, is it the successor to John Sebastian, who exited as P&G Marketing Director-North America Personal Care in September 2015 to join Newell Rubbermaid as VP/GM?

Whoever the new “wolf dog” is running the marketing for Old Spice better sit and learn a new trick, because Desperado is a desperate attempt to effectively attract the Latino consumer.

Yes, JC Harvey. We’re talking to you.

Adam R Jacobson: Ready To Make 2013 Ring For Your Business

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Adam R Jacobson

Hispanic Market Research and Analysis
Radio-industry Marketing Communications

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