Tag Archives: Hispanic radio conference

Nominations Set For ​Medallas De Cortez Awards

Nominations Set For Medallas De Cortez Awards

The Hispanic Radio Conference is pleased to announce this year’s finalists for the prestigious Medallas de Cortez, the only awards dedicated to honoring the very best in Hispanic radio. The Medallas de Cortez awards are named in honor of Raoul Cortez, founder of the first Spanish-language radio station in the United States, KCOR/San Antonio, in 1946. Raoul Cortez was a visionary for his time and a legend for all times in the annals of Hispanic radio.

Radio Ink Publisher Deborah Parenti said, “The Medallas de Cortez awards represent a celebration of Hispanic radio and its dedicated professionals. Every one of them, in large markets and small communities, make Hispanic radio an intimate part of the lives of listeners and clients. This is the biggest year ever in terms of awards competition. While there can be only one winner in each category, we are extremely proud to recognize all of the finalists, who are truly worthy of our respect and admiration.”

Winners will be announced at the ceremony on Wednesday, March 28, as part of the Hispanic Radio Conference, March 28-29 in Fort Lauderdale at the Hyatt Regency Pier Sixty Six.

2017 Medallas de Cortez Awards Finalists

Marketer of the Year
Vladimir Gomez, Spanish Broadcasting System
Esmeralda Sosa, Univision/Los Angeles
David Loving, Univision/Houston
Liz Blacker, iHeartMedia
Jose Villafañe, Entravision

Local Personality of the Year
Eric Johnson & DJ Gallo Show, WYMY/Greensboro
Beto Diaz KLAX-FM/Los Angeles
Stephanie Himonidis, La Pantera Radio/San Antonio
Javier Romero, WAMR/Miami
Juan “Manny” Yanez, KOYE/Tyler-Longview
Betsy Vazquez, WXDJ/Miami
Josue “El Bronco” Del Castillo, KDDS/Seattle

Syndicated Personality of the Year
Cesar Lozano, Spanish Broadcasting System
Omar Y Argelia, Univision
Alex Lucas, AL & CM Broadcasting
El Bueno, La Mala y El Feo, Univision
Erazno y La Chokolata, Entravision

Program Director of the Year
Raymond Torres, WRUM & WRUB/Orlando, Tampa
Isabel Gonzalez, KLVE & KRCD/Los Angeles
Juan Martin Ovalle, KOYE/Tyler-Longview, TX
Oscar Rios, KLNO/Dallas
Julie Garza, WYMY/Greensboro, NC
Rogie Gallart, SBS/Puerto Rico
Pedro Escalera, KLZT-FM HD2/Austin, TX
Tony Luna, KLOL-FM/Houston

Sales Manager of the Year
Shirley Davenport, WYMY/Greensboro, NC
Elizabeth Paulina, WSKQ & WPAT/New York
Christian De La Cruz, KRZZ/San Francisco
Candy Cintron, WLZL/Washington, DC
Corinna Ruiz, KOYE/Tyler-Longview, TX
Mauricio Palacios, KISF, KRGT & KLSQ/Las Vegas

General/Market Manager of the Year
Brian Barber, WLKQ & WNSY/Atlanta
Carolina Santamarina, WXDJ, WRMA & WCMQ/Miami
Chris Carillo, KLAX & KXOL/Los Angeles
Ginger Dockery, KOYE/Tyler-Longview, TX
Mark Masepohl, KLNO, KDXX, KFZO & KFLC/Dallas
Roberto Yanez, KHOT, KOMR, KQMR & KHOV/Phoenix

Station of the Year
WCMQ/Miami
KLVE/Los Angeles
WRMA/Miami
KOYE/Tyler-Longview, TX
KGBT/McAllen, TX
WLZL/Washington, DC
WSKQ/New York

Broadcaster of the Year
Jesus Salas, Spanish Broadcasting System
Tomas Martinez, Solmart Media
Carlos Moncada, AL & CM Broadcasting
Mike Flood, KBBX/Omaha (Flood Communications)
Norberto Sanchez, Norsan Media

MONTERO TO RECEIVE SPECIAL HONOR

This year’s awards include the presentation of the Distinguished Leadership Award, which is not presented every year, and to outstanding individuals who have made significant contributions to the development of Hispanic radio. The special award will be presented this year to Francisco (Frank) Montero, managing partner of Fletcher, Heald & Hildreth.

“There could be no one more deserving than Frank,” Ms. Parenti said. “Frank has dedicated years of service to the Hispanic radio community, actively providing leadership and direction to organizations, including the founding of the Independent Spanish Broadcasters Association, aimed at fostering growth in the Hispanic radio sector.”

Montero was also instrumental in helping start the American Hispanic Owned Radio Association (AHORA). Over the years, he has represented the Hispanic Radio Association, the Puerto Rico Radio Broadcasters Association and served as an advisor to the Radio Ink Hispanic Radio Conference since its inception, among other significant contributions.

Click here to register for the Hispanic Radio Conference.  Adam R Jacobson, publisher of the Hispanic Market Overview and editor-in-chief of the Radio + Television Business Report, is participating as a moderator on a panel focused on Hispanic and multicultural millennials.

 

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Medallas de Cortez Sponsor

Participating Sponsors

Corporate Sponsor

Media Partners

Hispanic Radio: Advertiser Education Of Medium’s Strengths Still A Top Need

CORAL GABLES, FL — “Radio, depending on where it fits, depends on the mindset of the client.”

Those words, spoken by Zubi Advertising vice president of media integration Isabella Sanchez at the just-concluded Radio Ink Hispanic Radio Conference, summed up the thoughts of buyers and planners who may not consider Spanish-language radio a high priority when formulating their Hispanic media strategies.

In fact, notes Tapestry media supervisor Sylvia Serna-Refojo, the success of Hispanic radio sales managers to capture a client relies in great part on their education of the medium’s strengths with Latino consumers to those that may not otherwise consider a buy.

Sanchez, fresh off her attendance at this week’s Hispanic television industry Upfronts in New York, and Serna-Refojo agree that Hispanic radio–compared to television, print media, and digital media–has the more difficult task of proving to a client how successful a campaign can be. Once Hispanic radio sales teams can effectively demonstrate the success of an effort, the client’s interest in radio may therefore increase.

Asked by moderator Jason Gueits, Hispanic sales specialist at McGavren Guild Media, how more clients can add Spanish-language radio into their media mix, Sanchez gave an answer sure to further agitate ratings firm Arbitron: “Radio stations do a great deal to attract the client, but the biggest gap between Hispanic radio and other media is measurement.”

Sanchez challenged Hispanic radio to show greater accountability for its listening estimates and overall exposure to Hispanic consumers. “It’s more than showing a client pictures of 10,000 people going to an event,” she says.

On a positive note, Serna-Refojo and Sanchez each note that all categories “have exploded with radio,” and that educating media planners on the medium’s strengths made the difference. Sanchez says automotive is up; her agency handles Hispanic market efforts for Ford Motor Company. Movie studios have also stepped up their efforts with Hispanic radio. “They finally seem to have realized that Hispanics can afford to go to the movies,” she says.

Financial services and pharmaceutical are also enjoying a healthy bump at Hispanic radio, she says.

However, Sanchez harps that continued education to clients of Hispanic radio’s positive attributes will be key to closing the gap with other media on attracting more advertisers, and thus more dollars. “Sometimes I feel like I’m in [the Bill Murray film] Groundhog Day, and I’m explaining once again the power of Hispanic consumers. We need research that proves the effectiveness of radio.”

Serna-Refojo went so far as to argue that Hispanic radio is self-destructive, thanks to its embrace of English-language pop hits and, in some cases, English-language program content. “If general-market stations are included in the buy, it sends the message that we don’t need Hispanic radio. If English-language music is on a Spanish-language radio station, then why is it needed in the buy?”

Sanchez concludes that radio has much to gain from increased promotion of its ability to reach a wide array of Hispanic consumers. “A lot of radio stations are surpassing TV,” she says. “Some clients want Spanish-language cable television, but nationally only 20,000 people are watching. The radio industry needs to be bolder and more aggressive. There needs to be more press releases about how successful radio is, and more interest from clients will come.”

 

Adam R Jacobson

 

 

Radio Ink Hispanic Radio Conference: Full Coverage

ADAM R JACOBSON, reporting from San Diego 

DAY TWO HIGHLIGHTS

‘CULTURE IS WHAT LINKS US TOGETHER’

And, says SBS CFO Joe Garcia, culture is what will make Spanish-language radiocontinue to maintain a sizeable audience in the U.S. Hispanic market. Garcia was joined by other group heads at the Radio Ink Hispanic Radio Conference’s concluding “Super Session,” with Davidson Media Group chairman Sanjay Sanghoee noting that Spanish-language radio stations the company owns and/or operates are likely to stay Spanish for years to come. Adelante Media Group CEO Jay Meyers believes that it will be at least 20 years before Hispanics start to tune out of Spanish-language radio in great numbers. Today, use of Spanish, or English, or a mix of both languages is highly dependent on how a company should best serve its particular market, says Entravision Communications radio division president Jeff Liberman. And if it is German Polkas that the Hispanic 18-49-year adult wants, that’s what they’ll get, says Univision Radio president José Valle.

‘IT’S TOUGHER THAN IT WAS TWENTY YEARS AGO’

Entravision’s Jeff Liberman says Hispanic radio needs to step up in unison and start fighting for its rightful share of the ad dollars. “We have to do a better job in sales and provide our advertisers reasons to buy us. Today, we have a more competitive marketplace. Research has gotten better. We need to unite, as an industry, and go after Corporate America. We can worry about competition later, but we need to hit Corporate America over the head … I’m going to do it whether I am joined or not.” Taking a similar tone, Adelante head Jay Meyers said he’s not one to go into an agency to talk about getting Hispanic advertising dollars. “I’m here to talk about how 100 percent of the dollars are going to reach 87 percent of the market … and that’s stupid! If we got 33 cents on the dollar for the percentage of the audience that is Hispanic, we wouldn’t be here [in San Diego] today. We’d be in Maui, paying our own way.”

DIGITAL COMPREHENSION VITAL TO LONGTERM INDUSTRY GROWTH

In opening comments on the second day of the Radio Ink Hispanic confab,Radio Ink publisher Eric Rhoads implored broadcasters to understand the impact online radio presents to them. “If you cannot understand these devices, you cannot protect your brand. You need to understand because it is changing the way people listen to the radio.” He discussed Tunein Radio (see Andres Cantor interview, above, for more) as a one-stop platform for radio and how manufacturers of audio systems desire one central delivery platform. “Ultimately, you need to be where your listeners are.”

‘CONTENT FLUIDITY IS REALLY IMPORTANT’

Tapestry Media Director Victor Garcia believes developing content that the media buyer can take wherever they want, free from the restrictions presented by working with one broadcast company over another, will best monetize beyond the AM/FM band and bring greater ROI. “To depend on one specific vehicle will leave us all shut,” he said. Speaking on a panel devoted to finding new accounts and fostering advertiser growth, Garcia noted that Starcom Mediavest’s Tapestry unit “wants to hold our multicultural plans to the same rigor as the general market.” He’s seen many situations where an investment occurs, but without a goal. His job – to stop such scenarios.

SESSION SOUNDBYTES

“The recording industry through downloads and digital content have taken it on the chin and are now trying to recoup by putting it on the backs of radiobroadcasters.” – Francisco Montero, co-managing partner of Fletcher, Heald and Hildreth, discussing the Performance Rights Act.

“When you sit around and look at some of the regulations broadcasters are forced to deal with, it’s just stupid. Having a public file was great stuff in the sixties, and the fifties, and the fourties. In 1977 people actually came in and looked at our public file. But today?” – Adelante Media Group CEO Jay Meyers, on how Federal government regulations need to better reflect today’s consumer environment.

“We need to think about creating environments and programs that get people engaged and stop offering one-way messages and treat them as users – and not as consumers.” – Sensis Agency president José Villa.

 

DAY ONE HIGHLIGHTS

Action. Unity. Those were the two words Radio Ink publisher Eric Rhoads asked attendees of the Radio Ink Hispanic Radio Conference to write down and act upon. Kicking off the two-day confab yesterday, Rhoads advocated for industry unity. “This conference represents opportunity for the heart of the radio industry to make change.”

Still, the industry has come a long way since 1962, when honorary conference chair and industry icon Eduardo Caballero launched a Spanish-language radiostation in New York. Later, when he launched a national network advertising sales representation firm for Hispanic radio, there were still challenges – just 49 Spanish-language radio stations were on the air in the U.S., and agencies ignored him. This forced Caballero to go direct to the advertisers – something that gives Hispanic broadcasters an advantage today, capitalizing on the ability to sell to people without having a microfocus on CPM.

‘DON’T MISUNDERSTAND THE THREAT OF THE INTERNET’

In a moving acceptance speech of the 2012 Lifetime Achievement “Medallas de Cortez” award, Lotus Communications CEO Howard Kalmenson urged conference attendees to pay heed to the threat of in-vehicle internet access – something that will end radio‘s exclusivity while on the road. “Exclusivity in the car has been our life blood. Now, you’ve got competitors you’ve never dreamed of. They don’t need towers. They don’t need offices. Think over what’s really coming … and ask, ‘What do I do for the next 50 years?’” Going back to basics is one of Kalmenson’s suggestions; he refused to reveal the other ideas he has in mind. Receiving 2012 Medallas de Cortez as Station of the Year for Markets 1-25: Entravision’s Mexican Regional KDLD-FM 103.1 “El Gato” in Los Angeles. Taking the award for markets 25+ is Connoisseur Media’s KBBX-FM in Omaha. For a full list of award winners, visit http://www.radioink.com.

A POLITICAL STORY THAT MUST INCLUDE HISPANICS

Hispanic entrepreneur Charles Garcia, best-selling author of A Message from Garcia and Leadership Lessons of the White House Fellows, told conference attendees in a keynote address that radio‘s key business trait is its ability to touch people’s hearts. He devoted much of his conversation to the importance of Latinos in the 2012 Race to the White House: Of the 15 “swing states” Republicans must capture, the majority have significant numbers of registered Hispanic voters. Given the lack of support among Latinos of the two leading Republican presidential nominees, Garcia believes it is nearly impossible for President Obama to lose the November election. For radio, bringing the political message of both the Republican nominee and Obama’s reelection campaign to Latinos is essential – and the industry should do its part to foster political advertising at its stations.

In a prerecorded statement, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) noted that radio plays a critical role, not just in this year’s elections, but moving forward with respect to connecting to a large segment of voters. Politicians should rely on Spanish-language to get the message out, and to continuously inform the public on information pertinent to them.

SESSION SOUNDBYTES

“We have to keep a particular eye on what is going on in digital. It is growing and it is working and at the end of the day it is about the right ROI.” – MEC Managing Director Gonzalo Del Fa

“To win the game, you have to know what the rules are to win that game.” – Programming consultant Bob Perry, who says a station with both English-language and Spanish-language programming is dependent on the unique dynamics of each individual market.

“In the PPM world we’re programming on a minute-by-minute basis.” – Haz Montana, Operations Manager, Univision Radio/Los Angeles, who believes growing the “big tent” has led to the end of Spanish-language radio shows known for “shock moments” designed to aid recall when completing an Arbitron diary.

For complete conference coverage, please visit http://www.radioink.com